Where Are They Now?
LARadio.com
Los Angeles Radio People, S
Compiled by Don Barrett

db@thevine.net

 

Saavedra, Neil: KKLA, 1990-92; KFI, 1996-2013. Neil is the marketing director at KFI and is "Jesus" on KFI's Sunday morning.
Sabo, Walter: KHJ, 1983; KRTH 1983-90, KLSX 1994-96. Walter is president of Sabo Media. He helped with the 2011 Merlin launch of all-News in Chicago and New York. Walt left by the end of the year. He was responsible for the programming strategy and implementation of all Sirius Satellite stations for 9 years. During that time he recruited the original KROQ air staff, hired the original MTV air staff, launched the Elvis Channel and made the first call to hire Howard Stern.
Sabol, Bob: KUTE, 1979. Unknown.
Saccacio, Jeff: KFI, 1994-96. Unknown.
Sacks, Glenn: KRLA, 2003; KMPC, 2003-04; KTIE, 2004-06. Glenn is a men's and fathers' issues columnist and a nationally-syndicated radio talk show host. His radio show, His Side with Glenn Sacks, is heard on KTIE-Inland Empire

Safroncikas, Vytas: KKAR, 1971-73; KPOL, 1976-79; KNX, 2001-09 and 2011-13. Vytas was a news reporter at KNX. He left the all-News station in September 2009. He also owns BornAgainRadio.com, an Internet-based contemporary Christian music radio station. He returned for part-time work in the summer of 2011 and left at the end of 2013.
Sahl, Mort: KLAC, 1967-68; KABC, 1968. Mort appears frequently in a one-man political satirist show.
Saint Claire, Claudine: KJOI, 1986-89; KXEZ, 1993-96. Unknown.
Saint John: KBIG, 2007-09. Saint John joined 104.3 MY/fm for evenings in early fall 2007 and left in early 2009. He's now with KMVQ (Movin' 99.7/fm) in San Francisco.

SAINTE, Dick: KRLA, 1969-71, pd; KHJ, 1971-72; KIIS, 1972. Born Dick Middleton in McMinnville, Oregon, he started out in his home state and worked at KISN-Portland and WIFE-Omaha and eventually teamed up with Johnnie Darin at KGB-San Diego. His next stop was KFRC-San Francisco in 1968. The Real Don Steele gave Dick his on-air name, and added "e" at the end of his name in 1970 following a suggestion by Dionne Warwick(e).

Dick joined KRLA in late 1969 and became pd in 1971, replacing Darin. At the 30-year KRLA reunion, host Casey Kasem said of Dick: "He had an exciting style that can really only be equaled by Dick's long-time friend, The Real Don Steele." Before 1971 ended, Dick became a "Boss Jock" on KHJ. He worked at KEX-Portland in the early 1980s. Beginning in 1993, Dick worked doing Country on KFMS-Las Vegas.

In 2004, Dick was placed in an extended care facility in The Dalles, Oregon. A year later he called the family [his four kids] and told them he was signing waivers to not be given any more insulin, etc. because he was lonely and tired of being sick. He died December 10, 2005, at the age of 67.

 “World Famous Tom Murphy worked with Dick in 1964 at KISN in Portland. “I last saw Dick at a KISN Reunion in 1997, although we did talk on the phone every now and then. He was fun to be around, a great talent and good friend. I remember in early 1970 on KRLA when Bob Dayton [noon – 3 p.m.] was told that he had to work some extra hours after his shift ended that afternoon, as the jock who normally followed him on the air, Dick Sainte [3 p.m. – 6 p.m.] would not be coming in to work to do his show, as he was home sick,” emailed Bill Earl of Dream-House, and When Radio Was BOSS. “Dayton said, ‘Looks like, I'll be filling in for Dick Sainte this afternoon. You see, Dick is flu-ish today. He doesn't look it...but he is.'" 

Sakellarides, Mike: KGFJ/KUTE, 1976; KPOL, 1976-78; KZLA, 1979-82; KFI/KOST, 1982-2007; KGIL, 2009-10; KTWV, 2010-14. Mike was the original midday host at AC KOST until November 30, 2007. He works weekends at the WAVE.
Sakrison
, Paul: KFWB/KNX, 2002-08; KLAA, 2008-14. Paul was chief engineer at the two all-News stations until February 2008 following a major downsizing by CBS Radio. He's chief engineer and assistant program director at KLAA, the Angels station.
Sala, Bob: KPPC, 1969-73; KROQ, 1978. Bob lives in Santa Rosa.
Salamon, Ed: KGBS/KTNQ, 1978. Ed is consulting and he's authored two books on radio history: Pittsburgh's Golden Age of Radio and WHN: When New York City Went Country.
Salazar, Liz: KWST, 1978-82. Liz is a nurse in Northern California.
Salgo, Jeff: KRHM; KBIG, 1970; KLAC, 1970; KKDJ, 1971-72; KWST/KMGG, 1982-84; KEZY, 1985-89; KROQ/KCBS/fm, 2002-14. Since 2002, he has been the Market IT Manager for CBS Radio Los Angeles.
Salinas, Josefa: KJLH; KPWR, 1993-98; KHHT, 2002-14; KTLK, 2012-13. Josefa works weekends at "Hot 92.3fm" and airs a "hot" music news feature that runs five times a day. She is also a guest host on KTLK.
Salley, John: KKBT, 2005-06. The NBA star and co-host of the Best Damn Sports Show Period! worked morning drive at the BEAT for almost a year. He's now a motivational speaker and he's writing a book.
Salvatore, Jack: KNX, 1984-2011. Jack was a news anchor at KNX who retired in early 2011.
Salvin, Linda: KLSX, 2005-08; KABC, 2008-09. Linda hosted a weekend psychic show, Visions & Solutions, on KABC.
Samuel, Brad: KYSR, 2003-05. Brad was made station manager at "Star 98.7" in late 2003 from DOS at KFI/KLAC. He went on to be vp of sales for Clear Channel/San Diego until September 2010. He is now the ceo of Epic Media Consulting in San Diego.
Sanchez, Elizabeth: KFI, 1990-93. Elizabeth is the host of the national PBS parenting show A Place of Our Own

   

(Ricardo Santiago, Joel Siegel, Bill Sommers, Matt Stevens, and Andrew Siciliano)

Sanchez, Ernie: KIQQ, 1982-84. Unknown.
Sanchez, Maria: KFI, 1997-98; KCLU, 2003-04; KKZZ; 2006-07. Maria left afternoon drive at KVTA-Ventura in late summer 2008. She's now hosting a morning talk show at LATalkRadio.com.
Sanchez, Ron: KHTZ, 1980-82 and 1984. Ron is local sales manager at KZZO-Sacramento.
Sancho, Willie: KKHR, 1983; KGFJ, 1984. Unknown.
Sandbloom, Gene: KROQ, 1993-2014. Gene is apd at KROQ.
Sandell, Clayton: KFWB, 1995-2000. In the fall of 2000, Clayton left the all-News station for a tv career in the Washington, DC bureau of ABC News. He is now in Denver covering area news for ABC News.

(Seena, Karen Slade, Kim Serafin, and Andy Stevens)

Sander, Dean: KLAC, 1961-97. Dean lives in Northridge and is retired.
Sanders, Arlen: KXLA/KRLA, 1956-63; KEZY, 1964-65; KIEV, 1967; KFOX, 1972-77. Arlen died of a stroke in 1994. He was 64.
Sanders, Brian: KCRW, 2001-05. Brian is the local host for Morning Edition.
Sanders, Laurie: KOST, 1985-91; KXEZ, 1991-92. Laurie hosted an evening Love Songs-theme show at KOIT-San Francisco for two decades. She left in March 2012.
Sanders, Stu: KFOX, 1957-60. Stu was program director and a jock at KFOX in Long Beach. He was a sergeant in the Army at the time.

 

(Bryan Simmons, Wallace Smith, Brent Seltzer, and Vytas Safroncikas)

Sandler, Nicole: KLSX, 1987; KNX/fm, 1988; KODJ, 1988-90; KLOS, 1990-94; KSCA, 1994-97; KACD, 1998-2000. Nicole left WINZ-Florida in late summer 2008.
Sandoval, Tony: KHHT, 2010-14. Tony works middays at HOT 92.3. He started radio in 1996 as an intern at KFRC-San Francisco while attending CCSF. In 1999, he went to work at KISQ 98.1 San Francisco. A year later he started the Sunday Night Oldies Show that aired in 5 markets including KHYL Sacramento. "I was in the middle of a four a year Auto Mechanic Program when I wondered into the college radio station and realized that would be my calling. I quit my job at the post office and started playing Old School ever since. I’m going into 15th year of being on the air at 98.1 KISS/fm-San Francisco."

SANNES, Cherie: KHJ; KRTH, 1979-82; KMGG, 1982-83. Cherie was a registered nurse in the Bay Area and got on KMBY-Monterey by a fluke: she became their "token woman" on-air while she was holding down her nursing job. "It was a sought-after gig, and I'm sure it may have offended some people that I got the job with very little experience in the business. I took a chance and it paid off."

Born in 1946, she told Broadcasting magazine, "I wanted to be a doctor and did what every middle class girl does, and that is become a registered nurse." When there was an opening at KFMB (“B-100”)-San Diego, she auditioned on the air and became the first female jock at the station. "B-100" pd Bobby Rich remembered, "Cherie flew down from Monterey, and we drove around town for a couple of hours chatting. I really thought she had potential, so although she had no audition tape, I put her on the air for a live try-out. She did so well that the next morning on the way to the airport I offered her the job!" In 1983 she hosted a 90-second syndicated feature called "California Way of Life" on the California Radio Network and worked briefly for the L.A. Traffic Network.

When she left the Southland, she relocated to the Monterey Peninsula in 1987 and combined her radio and promotions experiences in addition to her RN background to become the marketing and communications director for Natividad Medical Center in Salinas, winning numerous regional and local marketing and communications awards. Cherie has also become a respected mixed media artist with exhibits throughout Monterey County. She recently voiced liners for Bobby Rich's Internet radio station. Cherie volunteers for the Monterey County Make a Wish Foundation, serving as co-chair of the marketing committee, working with the Chair, Dina Eastwood. She lives with her husband Bob and four felines in Oak Hills, CA.

Santana, John: KFAC, 1977-89; KKGO/KMZT, 1989-2005; KMZT, 2006-07 and 2011. John was program director at K-Mozart 1260 AM for part of his stay at the Classical station. He returned to 1260AM with a format flip in April 2011.
Santiago, Larry: KZLA, 2002-06. Larry worked weekends at the Country station, KZLA until a format flip in 2006.
Santiago, Ricardo: Ricardo works at Metro Networks.
Santiago, Richard: KKHJ, 1991-92; KLVE, 1992-97. Richard works for CRC, the Heftel Spanish operation.
Santos, Karla: KDAY, 2007-08. Karla is market manager for Magic Broadcasting.
Santosuosso, Michelle: KKBT, 1997-98; KHHT, 2002-03. Michelle joined KHHT as pd in January 2002 and left her post in late 2003. She now runs a producer/songwriter management & branding company with her business partner, Tom Maffei (formerly of Arista Records).
Santoyo, Oscar: KOCM/KSRF, 1991-92; KWIZ, 1987-92. Oscar is now out of radio and went on to serve a four-year term on the board of the Newport-Mesa Unified School District.
Sargent, Kenny: KQLZ, 1991-93; KLOS, 1994-97; KLSX, 2001-03; KSPN, 2003-08; KLSX, 2008-09. Kenny hosts a syndicated car racing show that is heard in the Antelope Valley on KAVL.
Sartori, Maxanne: KLIT, 1994. Maxanne lives in New York and she is in the record business.
Saunders, Art: KZLA, 1983. Unknown.
Saunders, Michael: KKBT, 1998-99. Michael is program director at "Power 105.1"-New York.

 

(Licia Shearer, Dusty Street, Dick Sinclair, Allin Slate, and Sisanie)

Savage, Don: KACE, 1979-83; KNAC, 1984-85. Don works for Spafax Airline Network and he is producer, writer, interviewer and host for Inflight audio entertainment for 25 airlines. He also does voiceover and a lot of theatre.
Savage, Jack: KABC, 2000-07. Jack works for one of the traffic services.
Savage, Michael: KRLA 2004-07; KLAA, 2007-08; KGIL, 2008-09. Michael's show was heard in morning drive at KGIL 1260 and 540 until the spring of 2009. He continues in national syndication.
Savage, Rick: KROQ, 2005-09. Rick works weekends and fill-in at KROQ.
Savage, Tracie: KFWB, 2001-09. Tracie worked afternoons at all-News KFWB until a format flip in early fall of 2009. She owns Tracie Savage Communications, which provides companies with media and presentation training. She's a motivational speaker.
Savan, Mark: KFWB, 1968-80. Mark worked for a number of years with Chuck Blore Enterprises.
Saxon, Mike: KRHM, 1965-68. Mike is retired and battling MS. He lives in Northwest Florida.
Saxton, Richard: KFWB, 2000-06. Richard was a business reporter at all-News KFWB.

(Rick Stuart, Jeff Salgo, Bryan Styble, and Scott St. James)

Scannell, Ed: KNX. Ed went on to work for the Southern California Rapid Transit District.
Scarborough, Ed: KKHR, 1983-86. Ed was pd at KGLK (The Eagle)-Houston until early summer 2009. He's now account manager/sales at Salem Communications in Houston.
Scarborough, Joe: KABC, 2009-10. The host of MSNBC's Morning Joe started a two-hour syndicated show carried in L.A. by KABC. He now co-hosts Morning Joe on MSNBC.
Scarry, Rick: KEZY, 1968-72; KKDJ, 1972-73; KDAY, 1973-74; KGIL, 1974-79; KMET, 1979-81; KRTH, 1982-83; KHJ, 1984-85; KMET, 1986-87; KMPC/fm / KEDG, 1988; KLIT, 1989-91. Rick was a regular on Arli$$ and is seen on all the top tv shows.
Schary, Jill: KLAC, 1966-69. Jill Robinson is a novelist. Her most recent novel is Past Forgotten.
Scheele, Dr. Adele: KABC, 1985. Dr. Scheele is director, Career Center, California State University, Northridge.
Schefrin, Dean: KROQ, 2005-06. Dean started as the morning sports guy with Kevin & Bean in late 2005 and left in early 2006. He's writing screenplays.
Schell, Russ: KFOX, 1979-81. Russ lives in Nashville where he is vp of The Interstate Radio Network and The Road Gang Coast-to-Coast Network.
Schermerhorn, Ted: KLOS; KLYY, 1999; KXMX, 1999-2001; KDLE, 2007-08. "Anthony" left "Y107" in late 1999 following a format change to Spanish. After various stints as a casting, field and story producer on Big Brother and The Bachelor, Ted has dropped "Anthony" and goes by Tedd Roman at Indie 103.1/fm. 

 

(Chuck Southcott, Kenny Sargent, Skylord, and John W. Strobel III)

Schlessinger, Dr. Laura: KWIZ, 1976-79; KMPC, 1980-81; KABC; KWNK, 1989; KFI, 1991-2009; KFWB, 2009-10. Dr. Laura's syndicated show jumped from KFI in the spring of 2009. She departs KFWB at the end of 2010 to start at Sirius XM Satellite Radio in early 2011.
Schnabel, Tom: KCRW, 1979-2014. Tom hosts the weekend show, "Cafe L.A." He left KCRW in the spring of 2013 and currently hosts a tasty music show at Rhythm Planet blog.
Schneider, Michael: KCSN, 2004-08. Michael is tv editor at Variety. He hosted a weekly Hawaiian music show at KCSN until the summer of 2008.
Schneider, Wolfgang: KCSN, 1977-2007. Wolfgang originated The American Continental Hours, which was broadcast in German and English and heard on KCSN for 30 years. He played music from all over Europe, from polkas and operettas to contemporary German ballads. Wolfgang died May 20, at the age of 81. “Mr. Schneider was a class act and great lover of radio and sports, especially soccer," said Scalla Sheen, host of 'American Mosaic' at KCSN. “He was a great mentor to me, as I was training to be a board operator at KCSN/fm. During my undergrad years at KCSN/fm, Mr. Schneider had great patience and showed tremendous support.”
Schnitt, Todd: KQLZ, 1989-91; KFWB, 2009-12. Todd was part of Pirate Radio at KQLZ. His syndicated show was heard late night on News/Talk KFWB.
Schock, Bryan: KNAC, 1990-91 and 1993-95. Bryan left his music director/afternoon drive post at KPRI-San Diego in the summer of 2014. He's now living in Austin.
Schoen, Michael: KFWB, 90s. Michael is a news anchor at WCBS-New York.
Schofield, Dick: KFOX, 1965. Unknown.
Schofield, Susan Mendlin: KFWB and KRLA. Susan broadcast news and traffic for Metro Traffic Network until the fall of 2008 following a company downsizing.
Scholl, Michael: KSRF, 1990. Michael commuted from Fresno to work weekends at KSRF. He is living in Fresno.
Schorr, Arnold: KHJ, 1961-64; KGFJ, 1964-79; KUTE, 1973-79. Arnold lives in Orlando and consults radio stations while in semi-retirement.

     

(Mark Sudock, Carol Sobel, Paul Secrest, and Bob Shayne)

Schrack, Don: KNX, 1969-72; KFWB, 1974-79. Don was part of the embryonic decade of all-News KFWB and became nd in 1975. A third generation native of the Fresno County community of Selma, he majored in journalism at UCLA. Don has been in general management and/or station ownership since leaving Los Angeles. He is based in Yakima.
Schreiber, Art: KFWB, 1969-77. Art lives in Albuquerque.
Schreiber, Carson: KRLA, 1964; KBBQ, 1965-71; KLAC, 1971-76. Carson is in semi-retirement.
Schroeder, Ric: KFWB and KNX. After 15 years with KFWB and KNX as writer and editor, Ric left the radio business to pursue work on documentary films.
Schrutt, Norm: KZLA, 1980-81. The former KZLA gm and 33-year veteran of ABC radio is now a talent agent and partner in Atlanta-based Schrutt & Katz.
Schubeck, John: KIEV, 1993. John was primarily known as a #1 million-a-year tv anchorman in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles. He died penniless at age 61, in early October 1997.

(John Salley, Bob Shaw, Dave Styles, and Jack Snyder)

SCHUBERT, Bill: KBIQ/KBIG, 1961-65; KPOL, 1961-65; KKAR, 1965-68; KFWB, 1968-90. Bill was part of the launch of all-News KFWB in 1968 and he stayed for 22 years. He passed away May 30, 2008. He was 81 years old. Bill covered the assassination of Robert Kennedy, the 1971 Sylmar earthquake and election year campaigns of Richard Nixon and Jesse Unruh. Bill was a native Angeleno born August 31, 1926. He grew up in Alhambra and attended Pasadena City College, then St. Lawrence University in Canton, New York. In 1949, he started his radio career at WSLB-Ogdensburg, New York. Bill returned to L.A. in 1951 and worked as public relations director for the Southern California Edison Company. He returned to radio in 1958 at KDWC-West Covina. Prior to KFWB he also worked at KBIG, KPOL and KKAR.

 Bill took an early buy-out from Westinghouse (owners of KFWB) and retired in 1990 and lived in Covina. He secured a real estate license but became the primary caretaker for his ailing wife.

Schulman, Heidi: KFWB. Heidi lives in Washington, DC.
Schultz, Ed: KTLK, 2005-08; KGIL, 2008. Ed's syndicated Progressive show was carried early evenings at KTLK until the spring of 2008 when he was moved to KGIL 1260AM. Ed left the KGIL line-up in late 2008. He has a syndicated show.
Schultz, Edwin: KXLA/KRLA, 1959. Unknown.
Schumacher, Captain Max: KMPC. Capt. Max was killed when two helicopters collided over Dodger Stadium on August 30, 1966. His successor, Jim Hicklin, was slain in his stateroom aboard the cruise ship Princess Italia moments before the ship was to sail on a vacation trip to Mexico on April 2, 1973. Bill Keene stated that, with Schumacher at the helm, "KMPC wrote the book on how to cover L.A. traffic."
Schuon, Andy: KROQ, 1989-92. In early 2004, Andy left his vp/programming post at Infinity.
Schwartz, Edward "Buz": KMNY; KIEV. Buz died October 14, 2006. He was 80.

   

(Buz Schwartz, Frank Sontag, Kathleen Sullivan, Tom Storey, and Jeff Stevens)

Schwartz, Rick: KMPC, 1994; KXTA, 2004. Rick joined XTRA Sports in late Spring 2004 and was gone within a month.
Schwartz, Roy: KGBS, 1970. Unknown.
Schwartz, Stella: SEE Stella Prado
Schweinsburg, Mike: KROQ, 1970-78. Mike helped put KROQ on the air. He was program director/music director from 1974-76. He has lived in New York City for many years, and has worked for the New York City Council as an aide.
Scott, Al: KNOB, 1965; KGFJ, 1965-66; XERB, 1968. Unknown.

SCOTT, Bill: KROQ, 1984-85; KNAC, 1985-86. "Wild Bill" Scott died May 2, 2014. His colleague and dear friend Dusty Street made the announcement on her Facebook page: “One of my closest and dearest friends passed away from a stroke. Wild Bill Scott [Big Daddy] was the person who gave me my signature sign off ‘Fly low and avoid the radar.’ I'm crushed by this loss. He loved music and radio as much as anyone I know. We could sit for hours playing music for each other and often did. I love you my brother. RIP.”

 Scott grew up in Los Angeles and San Francisco and went to high school in Lake Tahoe. His early radio influences were the early days of KFWB and KRLA. His first radio gig was in Truckee, near Lake Tahoe in 1961.

In 1965, he spent a year at the Don Martin School of Broadcasting. His radio journey includes stations in Bakersfield and Reno, KUDL-Kansas City, KDKB and KUPD-Phoenix and WMYQ-Miami. At KMEL-San Francisco he was the first morning jock when the station became AOR.

In Detroit,  Scott worked for WABX, WWWW and WLLZ. The Chicago stations included WLUP and WMET, WKLS (“96 Rock”)-Atlanta and Houston followed.

Scott worked nine to midnight at "the Roq." He left the Southland to help establish the Z-Rock Satellite in Dallas. In the 1990s, he jocked in San Francisco at KFOG, KSFO and KYA and KFRC. He also hosted the "Dynamite Shack" on KDIA-San Francisco. His wife worked in San Francisco radio.

Click the artwork for a quick listen to Scott.

Scott, Bob: KNX, 1975-78 and 1984-98. Bob retired in early 1998.
Scott, Bruce: KOST, 2013-14. Bruce works afternoon drive at the AC station.
Scott, Dred: KCXX, 1996-97; KLSX, 1997-98; KMXN, 2002-03; KDLD, 2007-08; KSWD, 2008-10. Dred worked at 100.3 The Sound until early 2010 when the overnight live shift was eliminated.
Scott, Gary: KCRW, 2007-12. Gary has been the director of news programming at KCRW since July 2011, when he was promoted from his role as producer for the nationally syndicated "To the Point" and award-winning Southern California public affairs show "Which Way, LA?" Both are hosted by Warren Olney. Before joining KCRW, Gary was the Capitol bureau reporter Los Angeles Daily Journal Public Company, politics editor of the  San Gabriel Valley Newspapers, and he served as politics editor for three newspapers - the Pasadena Star-News, San Gabriel Valley Tribune, and Whittier Daily News - and acted as writing coach and co-city editor for the three newsrooms. He graduated from California State University at Berkley.
Scott, Dr. Gene: KHOF. The flamboyant tv preacher owned KHOF (99.5fm). Gene died February 21, 2005. He was 75.
Scott, Hanna: KFI, 2002-03 and 2009-10. The KFI traffic reporter joined the morning show at KFI as a reporter and left the station in the early summer of 2010.
Scott, Ivan: KABC, 1971-72. Ivan was the tv-radio director for Washington's Environmental Protective Agency.
Scott, Jeff: KIBB, 1996-97. Jeff works on Westwood One's Hot Country format and is an Emmy-winning producer for ABC/TV.

SCOTT, Kevin: KQLZ, 1989-95; KLSX/KRLA, 1998-2001; KFRG, 2001-04; KKBT/KSWD, 2004-2013. Kevin died February 5, 2013, at the age of 49 Kevin, chief engineer at 100.3/The Sound and at a number of Southland stations over his career, "fought cancer bravely for a very long time" said his wife, Melinda. "He continued to come to work long after beginning treatment because he loved 100.3 and the people." 

"Kevin and Melinda Scott have been a true radio love story," said The Sound's pd, Dave Beasing. "They met while working at their high school station in Indiana. Decades later, they became a couple and were married here at The Sound studios. Melinda was with Kevin 24/7 during his last months." 

Kevin was born in Heppner, Oregon where his dad was stationed in the Air Force. "We moved back to Indiana where my mother and father were both born and raised," said Kevin when interviewed for Los Angeles Radio People. "I moved to Palm Springs out of school and have never really looked back." 

He ran a consulting service in the Palm Springs area from 1983 until around 1987. Kevin was the director of engineering for General Broadcasting from 1987 to 1989, then to Pirate Radio. He was retained through the Viacom days and then to Heftel, KLVE KTNQ and CRC radio network around 1995. Around 1997, he spent a year in San Diego at XHRM.  

In 1998 it was back to Los Angeles at KLSX/KRLA with CBS. In 2001, he took the job at the K-FROG stations, KFRG, KXFG, KVFG, KRAK, and KEZN. In July of 2004 he joined KKBT. Bonneville bought the station in 2008, which became 100.3/The Sound.

SCOTT, Lara: KYSR, 2000-2006; KFSH, 2006-14. Lara joined KFSH, "The FISH," in May 2006. She co-hosts the "Family Friendly Morning Show" at the "FISH," as as well as afternoons from 3-7 p.m. Lara is also the host of The World Chart Show, an internationally syndicated countdown, and her voice has been heard on programs for Bravo, VH-1, the Olympic Encore on Universal Sports,  and in-flight programming for Delta Radio and Air Force 1.

Born in Southwest Florida, Lara headed west after high school.  She got into radio in Bend, Oregon, after randomly calling a local station, and then continued her broadcasting career in Portland.  After graduating with a B.S. in philosophy from Portland State University, she moved to San Francisco to become the music director and nighttime air personality at KZQZ. She then spent almost 7 years as the midday host at KYSR/Star 98.7.

Lara was a 2008 President’s Volunteer Service Award winner, which was presented by recording artist Michael W. Smith on behalf of President George W. Bush for her charity work.  In her free time, she can be found hanging out with her husband and son, snowboarding, biking, hitting thrift stores and flea markets, and attending lots of concerts and movies.

 

SCOTT, Larry: KBBQ, 1967-68 and 1971; KLAC, 1971-82. Larry works at KVOO-Tulsa. He hosts a weekly live radio show from Big Balls of Cowtown in Fort Worth, which is distributed throughout the world.

Born in Modesto in 1938, Larry spent most of his childhood in southwest Missouri. His first radio job was in Neosho, Missouri for 75 cents an hour. He became the unofficial spokesman for those fans who decried the "modern" trend in Country music. "I show the fans that I am still loyal to a sound they can relate to by the records I play."

Larry's love affair with Country music started while at Southwest Missouri State College. He became a friend of Chet Atkins while working at WAGG-Franklin, Tennessee in 1958.  

Before moving to Southern California, he worked at WIL-St. Louis and, beginning in 1961, spent four years at KUZZ-Bakersfield, where he befriended Buck Owens and Merle Haggard. He promoted records for a while, then became pd at KVEG-Las Vegas.

In 1966 he worked at KBOX and KRLD-Dallas/Ft. Worth. A year later, his general manager moved to Los Angeles and Larry followed on June 17, 1967. In 1968, Billboard listed Larry the 2nd most popular country dj. The CMA voted him #1 DJ of the Year four times between 1968 and 1974. In 1971, Larry returned to KBBQ after a stint as pd in St. Louis. In 1973, he was working at KLAC and won his second consecutive DJ of the Year award from the CMA. Larry created the "Phantom 5-70 Club" for truckers only, and it boasted 8,000 members in 1975.

Larry left KLAC in 1982 to host the "Interstate Radio Show" out of Shreveport. In 1994, Larry was voted into the Disc Jockey Hall of Fame in Nashville. In 1999, the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame honored Larry.

Scott, Morton: KLAC, 1965-67. Unknown.

   

(John Sebastian, Dr. Allen Selner, Sheena, and Al B Sure)

Scott, Rick: KRTH/KHJ, 1985-86. Rick is working in the computer industry in Los Angeles.
Scott, Robertson: KPOL, 1952-71. Bob lives in Santa Barbara and runs two radio stations.
Scott, Steve: KHTZ, 1980-85; KRTH, 1985-90. Steve works in patient care for a home oxygen company in New Mexico.
Scott, Tony: KLOS, 2001-14. Tony works swing at KLOS and hosts The Seventh Day.
Scott,Tori: Tori broadcasts traffic for for a number of So Cal stations.
Schrutt, Norm: KZLA, 1980-81. Norm is a talent agent and partner in Atlanta-based Schrutt & Katz.
Schwartz, Rick: KMPC, 1994. Unknown.
Scroeder, Ric: KFWB, 1988-99. Ric was a newsman at all-News KFWB.
Scruggs, Newy: KXTA, 1998-2000. Newy left all-Sports "XTRA" in the spring of 2000 for a tv sports anchor position in Dallas. In late 2012, he joined weekends at the NBC Sports Radio Network and in the spring of 2013 moved to middays.
Sculatti, Gene: Gene is director of special issues at Billboard working on the Spotlight section.
Scull, Cindy: KLOS, 1993-94; KNAC, 1994-95. Cindy works mornings at KEGL-Dallas.
Scully, Vin: KMPC, 1958; KFI, 1959-72; KABC, 1972-97; KXTA, 1997-2003; KFWB, 2003-07; KABC, 2007-11; KLAC, 2011-14. Vin is the premiere voice of the Los Angeles Dodgers.
Sea, Craig: SEE Craig Carpenter
Seacrest, Ryan: KYSR, 1995-2003; KIIS, 2004-14. Ryan worked afternoon drive at "Star 98.7" until leaving to devote full-time to his syndicated tv show, On-Air with Ryan Seacrest, which was cancelled almost 8 months later in the summer of 2004. On February 26, 2004, Ryan took over mornings at KIIS/fm. He is the host of the enormously successful American Idol.
Sebastian, Dave: KEZY, 1971-74; KHJ, 1974-77; KFI, 1978; KTNQ, 1978-79; KIIS, 1980; KBRT, 1981-82; KIIS, 1983; KHJ, 1985; KRTH, 1994-96. Dave Sebastian Williams has an active voiceover career and owns Dave & Dave in Studio City.
Sebastian, Joel: KLAC, 1964-65. The former personality with WXYZ-Detroit and WLS-Chicago died January 17, 1986, after a long bout with pneumonia and prostate cancer.
Sebastian, John: KHJ, 1978-79; KLOS, 1981; KTWV, 1988-89; KXLA/KLAC, 1996-98. John left the JACK/fm station in Chicago for The Wolf in Dallas in March 2007. He left the Wolf in early 2008. He spent two years as vp/operations for Majestic Broadcasting in Roswell, New Mexico. He left in early 2014.
Secrest, Paul: KEZY/KXMX, 1998-2000; KIIS/KXTA, 2000; KMXN, 2000-02. Paul worked at "COOL Radio," 94.3fm" until the station was sold in late 2002.
Sedens, Chris: KFWB, 2007-09; KNX, 2009-14. Chris was a reporter at all-News KFWB until the fall of 2008. He's now free-lancing at KCBS/Channel 2 and KNX.
Seena: KAMP, 2011-13. Seena works the all-night shift at AMP Radio.
Segal, Karen: KLSX, 1994. Karen is writer, producer, editor and director for television. She directed The Benefactor.
Seiden, Fred: KBIG/KBRT, 1973-80; KOST, 1981-82. Fred ended his life by jumping from a building in 1991. In the 1970s, Fred was head of programming for Bonneville Program Services.
Sellers, Steven O: KQLZ, 1992-93. Steven works at KONO-San Antonio.

 

 

(Mike Stark, Mike Sakellarides, Ira Sternberg, and Julie Slater)

Selner, Allen: KABC, 1984-94. Allen is a podiatrist working in the San Fernando Valley.
Seltzer, Brent: KWST, 1975-76; KMET, 1976-78; KZLA, 1979; KNX/FM, 1980. KMPC, 1981-82. Brent works news at KABC and KNX and has an active voiceover career and writing and hosting "Non Profit Profiles" on several cable access stations throughout Los Angeles County. His two-minute commentaries appear on XM Satellite Radio.
Sender, Jack: KBIG; KBRT, 1975-79. Jack is retired and lives in Roma, Italy and he spends the hot summers in Huron, Ohio where he was born.
Serafin, Kim: KABC, 2002-06. Kim worked swing at KABC until the summer of 2006. She is the senior editor for In Touch Weekly.
Seraphin, Charlie: KNX/fm / KODJ, 1988-91. Charlie is the executive vp for the Tulsa 66ers, NBA Development League.
Serena, Nancy: KJAZ, 2000-02. From Boston, Nancy worked weekends at all-Jazz, KJAZ until a format change in the spring of 2002. She is now a casting agent.
Sergis, Charlie: KFWB, 1971-98. Charlie retired from KFWB on April 4, 1998.
Serr, Jeff: KIIS, 1982; KMGG, 1983-85; KBIG, 1986-88; KODJ/KCBS, 1988-2005; KKGO/KGIL/KMZT, 2006-12. Jeff is the production/imaging director for KKGO.
Servantez, Joe "the Boomer": KPWR, 1986-96; KACD, 1996; KIBB, 1996-98; KACD, 1998; KRTH, 2002; KMVN, 2007. Joe is a California realtor and he works part-time at Movin 93.9/fm.
Sesma, Chico: KOWL, 1949-57; KALI, 1957-67. Chico lectures to disadvantaged kids.
Severn, Jim: KBIG, 2004-05. Jim worked weekends at KBIG until late 2005.
Seward, Bill: KXLU, 1976-80; XPRS, 1980-81; KWNK, 1987-88; KGIL, 1989; KNX, 1990-1997; KFWB, 2001-14. Bill broadcasts sports at KFWB.
Sexton, Miles: KEZY/KORG, 1990-95. Miles is coo of Point Broadcasting, parent company of Gold Coast Broadcasting, and High Desert Broadcasting, licensee of 11 radio stations in Ventura County, Palmdale and Lancaster.

   

(Jeff Serr, The Real Don Steele, and Michael Schoen)

Seymour, Ruth: KPFK, 1960s-70s; KCRW, 1980s-2009. Ruth is general manager at KCRW. She retired in February 2010.
Shackelford, Lynn: KLAC. Lynn was Chick Hearn's sidekick during LA Lakers broadcasts. He was on Coach John Wooden's 1968-69 UCLA basketball team that started Lynn with Lew Alcindor, Curtis Rowe and Sidney Wicks.
Shade, Jeff: KMPC, 1992-94; KLIT, 1994; KACD, 1995-96; KABC/KDIS, 1998-2001. Jeff is working in voiceover and tv production from L.A. and Seattle.
Shafer, Don: KNAC, 1969-70; KYMS, 1971-73. Don is vp/regional manager of the BC Interior Group of Astral Media Radio, based in Kelowna, British Columbia.
Shalhoub, Martha: KLVE, 1976-2001; KXOL, 2001. Martha works middays at KXOL.
Shalhoub, Shelley: KLVE, 1998-2001; KXOL, 2001. Shelley joined KXOL in the spring of 2001.
Shana: KHJ, 1976-78; KEZY, 1978-80; KROQ, 1980; KLOS, 1980-86; KLSX, 1986-95; KPCC, 1996-99; KCBS, 2001-05. Shana is a free-lance entertainment consultant.
Shane, Ed: KKDJ, 1971. Ed was the pd at Top 40 KKDJ. He lives in Houston and has written several books. In 1977, he founded Shane Media Services to provide management, research and programming consultation to the radio industry.
Shannon, Bob: KWIZ, 1975-76; KFI, 1976-79; KWIZ, 1979; KHJ, 1979-82; KLAC, 1982; KRTH, 2000-2002. Bob joined "K-Earth" for swing in the spring of 2000 and left in the spring of 2002.
Shannon, Bob "Shamrock": KCSN, 1983-85. Bob was a longtime radio and tv announcer working as a CBS network announcer in the late 1940s. His voice was heard on such shows as Lionel Barrymore's "Mayor of the Town" and "The Jimmy Durante-Garry Moore Show." From 1949-54, Bob had a radio quiz show, "The Man Says Yes," which he attempted to revive on KCSN in the mid-1980s. He died August 15, 2000 at the age of 79.
Shannon, Gregg: XTRA/KOST; KDAY, 1971-72; KRLA, 1972-73; KROQ, 1973-74. Unknown.
Shannon, Jim: KTBT, 1967-68; KREL, 1968; KEZY, 1969-70. Jim works at Oldies KQZQ-St. Louis.

SHANNON, Scott: KQLZ, 1989-91; XESURF, 2004-05. Scott was the architect for "Pirate Radio" (KQLZ) in the late 80s. For 22 years he was the morning host on the enormously successful WPLJ-New York. He left in early 2014.

Michael Scott Shannon's name is derived from two early influences: WABC's Scott Muni and CKLW's Tom Shannon. Scott is a radio history buff and told the LA Times that he has over 2,000 hours of KHJ "Boss Radio" and 500 hours of KFWB "Color Radio" airchecks from the late 1950s and early 1960s. Scott dropped out of high school in Indianapolis at age 17. “I wanted to get away from it all. I thought I was James Dean," he told a trade publication.

In the 1970’s Scott was a jock and pd at several southern stations, he later joined Casablanca Records, was national pd for Mooney Broadcasting and was a record executive with Ariola Records.

In 1979 he returned to radio as pd at WPGC-Washington, DC and later WRBQ-Tampa/St. Petersburg. In a Billboard interview Larry Berger of WPLJ-New York said of Scott: "I always thought of Shannon as a PT Barnum character. He was better than just about anybody at creating sizzle on a radio station, and quite a talented on-air personality."

In January 1989, Scott left WHTZ (“Z-100”)-New York, where he was 1987's Billboard magazine Program Director of the Year in the Top 40 category, to launch "Pirate Radio" for Westwood One. In the beginning at "Pirate Radio" KQLZ, Scott was on the air as “Bubba, the Love Sponge.” To launch the new format in LA, the station sold only one spot per hour at $1,000 each, which was $300 to $400 more than KPWR. The immediate media attention to Scott and "Pirate Radio" was enormous. Even USA Today chronicled AC KIQQ becoming KQLZ. The produced spots between music boldly declared, "Don't Be a Dickhead" and "When you're on the air in Southern California, you've got to be loud to cut through the crap."

A year later the station stalled and Westwood One let Scott go. In 1993, Shannon was cited by Radio and Records for excellence in programming during the past 20 years. Scott recalled his highlight during this period as being when he took WHTZ-New York from "worst-to-first" in 74 days, calling it "a thrill I'll never forget."

Scott was one of the first vj’s on VH-1. He hosted the nationally syndicated "Smash Hits Video Countdown " for three years and was the subject of a feature story on CBS's 48 Hours. Shannon's influence and innovation in contemporary radio can be heard on radio stations across the country. His impact on the radio business has been so far-reaching that his peers in the radio business named him the "Most Influential Programmer of the Past 20 Years," according to a special survey conducted by R&R.

The son of a career army soldier, he spent his youth moving from one town to another, soaking up the local radio scenes. His first job, at age 17, was in Mobile. Then it was on to Memphis, Nashville, Atlanta, Washington, DC and Tampa -- where he created the successful format known as the "Morning Zoo" -- a daily 4-hour party-on-the-radio.

Shannon, Steve: KMPC, 1978-80. Steve lives in St. Louis.
Shapiro, Ron: KIIS, 1989-96; KLIT, 1997; KCMG/KHHT, 1998-2014. Ron is assistant program director and creative services director at "Hot 92.3."
Shappee, Michael: KMNY, 1988; KFWB, 1990-2014. Michael is a news anchor at News Talk KFWB.
Sharell, Jerry: KGIL/KMZT, 2006-13. Jerry hosted a Sunday evening show playing songs from Frank Sinatra.
Shark: KROQ, 1994. Shark is working in Chicago.

(Carson Schreiber, LaRita Shelby, and Michelle Santosuosso)

Sharon, Bob: KFWB, 1960-67; KPOL, 1967-70; KIIS, 1970-71. Bob is an AE for the three-station American General Media company in Santa Maria/Lompoc market.
Sharp, Bill: KACE, 1997-2000; KJLH. 2000-2001. Bill works swing at KJLH.
Sharp, Colin J.: KDAY, 1966; KFWB. Colin worked at WIND-Chicago before coming to the Southland to work at KDAY and KFWB. He moved to Hawaii and worked for many years at KUMU-Honolulu. Colin retired in 1989 and moved to Kauai. He died August 19, 1998, at the age of 65.
Sharp, Karen: KWIZ, 1987; KOST, 1988-2014. Karen hosts "Love Songs on the KOST."
Sharp, Tawala: KKBT, 2000-06. From behind the scenes at "the BEAT," Tawala hosted the overnight show.
Sharpe, Jim: KYSR, 1993-95. Jim works mornings at all-Talk KTAR-Phoenix.
Sharpe, Melissa: KYSR, 1993-95. Melissa worked mornings at KIFM-San Diego until the summer of 2006. She now works mornings at KYOT-Phoenix.
Shaughnessy, Pat: KIQQ, 1973-79. Pat runs AVI Communications of Dallas.
Shaun, Jackye: KNX, 1976-2000. Jackye is part of KNXNewsradio. In 1999 she won a Golden Mike Award for Best News Writing.
Shaw, Bob: KKLA, 1998-2000; KFSH, 2000-14. Bob co-hosts the Family Friendly Morning Show at "The Fish."
Shaw, Dave: KFI, 1964. Unknown.
Shaw, Don: KMPC, 1992. Unknown.
Shaw, Rick: KEZY, 1984; KNX/fm, 1986: KIKF, 1998-99. Rick was pd/om for the Amaturo group of four at 92.7/fm until a station sale at the end of 2012. He's now with KATY-Temecula.

   

(Miles Sexton, Sondoobie, Kat Snow, Shana, and Michael Shappee)

Shayne, Bob: KPFK, 1959; KVFM, 1959-60; KNOB, 1961-63; KPPC, 1967. Bob teaches screenwriting, tv writing, production and tv history as an adjunct professor at Chapman University in Orange, CA.
Shearer, William: KGFJ, 1973-74; KLOS, 1974-77; KACE, 1977-84; KGFJ/KUTE, 1984-85; KGFJ, 1986-96. In the fall of 1997, Bill joined American Urban Radio Networks as vp of west coast operations.
Shearer, Harry: KRLA, 1965-70; KPPC, 1970-71; KMET, 1975; KCRW, 1987-2013; KCSN, 2013-14. Harry hosts "Le Show" at KCSN and voices many characters on the Simpson's.
Shearer, Licia: KGFJ, 1989-96; KACE, 1996. Licia runs Shearer Energy Productions, a communications/entertainment company.
Shearer, William: KGFJ, 1973-74; KLOS, 1974-77; KACE, 1977-84; KGFJ/KUTE, 1984-85; KGFJ, 1986-96. Bill is vp of West Coast operations of American Urban Radio Networks.
Sheehy, Michael: KNX/fm, 1976-83; KKHR, 1983; KTWV, 1990-2000. Michael left his production job at "the Wave" to operate his own production facility.
Sheen, Lily: KCBS, 1998-2005; KNX, 2005-08. Lily, a British native, worked weekends at "Arrow 93." She worked in the programming department at KNX until February 2008 following a major downsizing at CBS Radio.
Sheen, Scalla: KCSN, 1997-2007. Scalla hosted "American Mosaic" on the Cal State Northridge radio station. 
Sheff, Stanley: KROQ, 1977-82. Stanley produces theatrical and film projects.
Shelby, LaRita: KGFJ, 1985-90. During much of the 1990s, LaRita was on AFRTS. She runs a music, media, and marketing company in association with Charles Wright Productions.
Shelden, Thom: KJOI, 1987-89. Thom is teaching.
Sheldon, Harvey: KFOX, 1985. Harvey hosts a hard rock video show on local access cable tv in Orange County.
Sheldon, Mark: KUSC, 1999-2003. Mark died December 8, 2003 of cancer. He was 43.
Shelton, Iris: KRLA, 1981; KFWB, 1988. Unknown.
Sherman, Gene: KABC, 1969. Unknown.

(Joe Scarborough, Bob Sharon, Josefa Salinas, and Sharise)

SHERWIN, Wally: KABC, 1970-89. “Adee Do!” Wally Sherwin’s tv commercial for a plumbing service called Adee Plumbing gave him as much notoriety as his decades-long role as pd of KABC. In the tv spot he appeared as a white-haired plumber who advertises the services of Adee Plumbing and Heating. At the end of the commercial he widens his eyes and proclaims, “Adee Do!” 

Wally died peacefully August 6. He was 89 years old. During the 1960s Wally was program director and general manager at KHJ/Channel 9. While at KHJ, Wally pioneered daytime live tv by introducing the Tempo Show and later won an Emmy for producing a live concert at the Hollywood Bowl. In the 1970s and ‘80s, Wally was program director at KABC. “So sorry to hear of the death of Wally Sherwin,” emailed Ken Minyard, mornings at KABC for decades. “During my many years at KABC Wally was the longest serving program director and certainly the most memorable. This was a different radio era that featured much less confrontation or manufactured controversy and a lot more fun. Wally was a showman who always emphasized that broadcasting was an entertainment medium and that if we managed to have a good time on the air it was likely that the audience would enjoy it as well. During Wally's tenure, our show traveled all over the world. Wally produced the shows, lined up the guests and generally was the one who had to deal with the many technical problems that regularly occurred.  When we first started doing the shows in the early 80's our most high tech pieces of equipment were an ISDN and a fax machine so you can imagine."

Sherwood, Lee: KIIS, 1970-71; KHJ, 1980-82. Lee hosts a widely syndicated Country show and last heard on KDJR-DeSoto, Missouri.
Sherwood, Tom: KRLA, 1989-98. Tom produces the syndicated "Art Laboe Killer Oldies Show."
Shuman, Phil: KABC, 2001-02. The KNBC/Channel 4 reporter/anchor hosted a weekend talk show at KABC.
Shields, Cal: KAGB, 1974-78; KACE, 1978-83. Cal has been working for a local cable company and is an active participant in Too Lunar Productions.
Shields, Del: KAGB, 1974-78. Del is a minister in New York.
Shindler, Merrill: KABC/KMPC/KTZN; KLSX, 1998-2008; KABC, 2010-12. Merrill hosts the weekend "Dining Out" show at KABC.

   

(Jim Svejda, Bruce Scott, Karen Sharp, Lisa Stanley, and Susan Schofield)

Shirk, Larry: KPCC, 1985.
Shore, Dave: KSPN, 2010. Dave started as operations manager at KSPN on 12.15.10

Shore
, Sandy: KMEN, 1984-86; KWIZ, 1987-89; KTWV, 1988-2000. Sandy is president/founder of the first jazz radio station on-line, and the World's Smooth Jazz station, SmoothJazz.com. She lives in Monterey, California.
Shurian, Scott: XTRA, 1961-63; KMPC, 1963-68 and 1975-79. Scott lives in Salt Lake City, and is a semi-retired voiceover guy and is a travel related writer/producer.
Shust, Billy: KIKF, 1998-2000. Billy the Kid was a Country dj at Orange County's KIKF.
Siciliano, Andrew: KSPN, 2009-10. Andrew joined Mychal Thompson for a midday show at KSPN in the summer of 2009 and left the all-Sports station in late 2010. Since 2005, he has been the host of DirecTV's NFL Sunday Ticket Red Zone. Andrew also serves as a host for NFL Total Access on the NFL Network.
Sidders, Carolyn KOCM, 1986-87. Unknown.
Siegal, Jack: KJOI, 1970-73; KPSA, 1973; KLVE, 1973. Jack was president of Chagal Companies, a multi-media investment/consulting firm dealing in broadcast ownership. The company owned KJOI and KFOX. He died July 16, 2004, at the age of 75. Siegal was a West Virginia native who grew up in Philadelphia, After starting the radio station at the University of Pennsylvania and graduation, he joined the Navy and became a radio combat correspondent in the Korean War. He also arranged radio and television coverage of the Korean War truce negotiations at Kaesong and Panmunjom.

SIEGEL, Joel: KPPC, 1970-71; KMET, 1971. Joel was best known for his entertaining movie reviews on ABC’s Good Morning America for a quarter of a century. His cheerful personality and trademark wit allowed him to be candid and honest without being hurtful. Joel was also a LARP, working at KPPC and KMET in the early 1970s.

He died June 29, 2007 of colon cancer. He was 63. This was not the first time that cancer was in Joel’s life. In 1982, Joel’s wife Jane died from brain cancer when she was 31.

Joel broadcast news on KPPC and had a weekly program, “Uncle Noel’s Mystery Theatre” during its “underground” radio period. A native of East Los Angeles, he graduated cum laude from UCLA. He had an eclectic early life. On a 20/20 segment on the evening of his passing, they devoted its final segment to Joel’s life. “I’m really proud that I knew Martin Luther King and even more he knew me,” said Joel from an earlier interview. His friendship with King and his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement of the 60s was an example of “standing up for what’s right.” 

Jeff Gonzer remembered that Joel had this enormous collection of old radio dramas, comedies and serials. “He started me using ‘Chandu the Magician,’ that I ran every morning on my show at KPPC [1970-71]. Then he began his Uncle Joel's Comedy Hour, a weekend show that featured old radio comedy shows from the 40s and 50s. Also on the weekends he would host Uncle Noel's Mystery Hour and run spookie and mystery shows from the same era. After we all were fired from KPPC I moved to KMET and Joel did too, as the newsman.

On August 1, 1972, Joel joined WCBS/TV-New York and four years later became the entertainment critic at WABC/TV-New York. In 1996, Joel found someone else he hoped to grow old with. She got pregnant, he got cancer. In 2004 he wrote a book to his five year-old son called Lessons for Dylan, a "just in case" autobiography and tutorial for his son. At his book publication party he told his friends, “I’m glad to be there and to quote George Burns, I’m glad to be anywhere.” He continued working almost until the end of his life without losing his cheerful personality and trademark wit, wrote a colleague on the network's Web site.

The 20/20 tribute piece concluded with: “Joel never complained. He always had a warm smile. He will be an inspiration.”

Siegel, Mike: KABC, 2000. Mike's "Coast to Coast AM" was on KABC from the spring of 2000 until November.
Sietsema, Rick: KNX, 2004-10. Rick is in technical operations at KNX.
Sifuentes, Karla: KRLA, 1996-98. Unknown.

(Ed Schultz, Teresa Strasser, Michael Savage, and Wolfgang Schneider) 

SIGMON, Loyd: KMPC. Loyd devised a system to make it easy for the police to alert radio stations. The system gave each radio station a special receiver tuned to a specific frequency and attached to a tape recorder. A dispatcher at LAPD headquarters could press one button to activate all the machines and announce the nature of the problem. "What I had in mind was to get more listeners for KMPC, to be honest with you," said Sigmon. When the LAPD broadcast the first SigAlert on Sept. 5, 1955, the announcement caused even more trouble than the accident that had precipitated it. A train en route from Union Station to Long Beach had derailed downtown, rolling onto its side. When the LAPD sent out a plea for doctors and nurses in the area through the new system, so many responded that they created a traffic jam themselves.

Born in Stigler, Oklahoma in 1910, Loyd was the son of a cattle rancher, educated at Wentworth Military Academy and got a ham radio license at age 14. He started his radio career at WEEI-Boston and KCMO-Kansas City. Loyd spent three years in Europe during World War II where he was officer in charge of radio communications for the European Theater where Colonel Sigmon directed building of the world's largest mobile transmitter, 60,000 watts. Prior to selling his interest in Golden West, Loyd was it’s corporation's executive vp, with Gene Autry ran a number of radio stations and KTLA/Channel 5, was vp of operations at KMPC and was part of the acquisitions of the California Angels. The California Highway Patrol took over responsibility for the freeways in 1969, and with that the SigAlert system as well. And though most radio stations now get information about SigAlerts from the CHP Web site, the name has remained - striking terror and dread in the hearts of L.A. drivers.

Loyd died June 2, 2004, at the age of 95. 

 

(Michael Schneide, Dr. Gene Scott, and Dean Schefrin)

Signal, Tori. Tori has been the traffic reporter on KFWB, KMPC and KYSR. She's currently directing traffic during morning drive at the WAVE.
Silver, Jack: KLSX, 1997-2009; KFWB/KRTH, 2010; KABC, 2010-11; KABC/KLOS, 2011-12. Jack left his past as an AE with KTWV and K-EARTH on July 10, 2010, to become program director at KABC. In the fall of 2011, Jack added programming chores at KLOS. New owners, Cumulus, let Jack go in June 2012. In July 2012, Jack was appointed pd at NBC Sports Radio Network.
Silver, Jordin: KYSR, 2013-14. Jordin joined weekends at Alternative 98-7 from KNDD-Seattle in early summer of 2013.
Silvius, Jon: KRLA, 1966 and 1969-74. John was killed in a plane crash January 6, 2003. He was 55.
Simers, T.J.: KLAC, 2006-07. T.J., page 2 columnist with the LA Times, launched a new morning show with his daughter Tracy and Fred Roggin on October 30, 2006. The show ended September 27, 2007. Since 2013, T.J. has been writing for the the Orange County Register.
Simers, Tracy: KLAC, 2006-07. Tracy co-hosted a morning show (Roggin & Simers Squared) on all-Sports KLAC until September 27, 2007.
Simmons, Brian: KFWB, 1963-64. Unknown.
Simmons, Bryan: KOST, 1982-2001; KBIG, 2002-04; KOST, 2004-11; KTWV, 2011-14. Bryan returned to afternoons at KOST in early summer of 2004. He exited KOST in late summer of 2011. Bryan now works weekends and fill-in at "the WAVE."
Simms, Greg: KYSR, 1999-2000. Greg is working at "the Walrus" in San Diego. 

SIMMS, Lee "Baby": KRLA, 1971-73; KROQ, 1973; KMET, 1973; KRLA, 1975. Only 16 in 1961, LaMar Simms quit high school and started his 40-year radio career as Hot Toddio On The Radio at WTMA in his hometown of Charleston, South Caroina. His best recollection is that he worked at 35 stations in 22 markets. He was known as Lee Simms or Lee Baby, a nickname given to him by pd Woody Roberts at KONO in San Antonio. He had 41 jobs, working at some stations twice, and was fired 25 times. Lee says, "I guess I really wanted to be a dj, but I never accepted an insult from anyone."

 

 

Top 40 programmer George Wilson became an early mentor when Lee joined WMBR/1460 in Jacksonville, Florida in 1963. He worked atWLOF-Orlando and WSHO-New Orleans (the only time he was a pd) and WIST-Charlotte before Wilson set him up at KRIZ-Phoenix in 1964. He was there for 18 months before he started moving back and forth between KONO-San Antonio and  WPOP-  Hartford  in 1966 and 1967. He joined WKYC-Cleveland in 1968. His annual salary was $18,000 and it was the first time he had worked with a board operator. Regarding that experience, Lee says, "It's impossible for an engineer to hear what's in your head." Six months into the Cleveland gig, everyone was fired, and Lee went home to Charleston.

 

A few weeks later, Wilson called again, and Simms was off to San Diego and KCBQ, working with programmers Mike Scott and Buzz Bennett. When Scott left for WJBK/Detroit, Lee moved again.

 

With the exception of WMYQ/fm-Miami and WGCL-Cleveland, Lee Baby worked most of the seventies in Los Angeles, twice at KRLA. He was 27 in 1971 and making about $30K annually. He moved to KROQ until his paychecks started bouncing, then he moved to Miami. Lee returned to KRLA as veterinarian "Doctor Matthew Frail" in 1975, and did a two-hour "audition" on KMET. Following six-months of a morning show in Cleveland, circa 1976, he did two nights on KTNQ, and then went to Honolulu as the guest of Wally Amos. He stayed five years, working at KKUA, KORL, KDUK and KPOI. Lee says, "I sometimes think that some guys hired me just so they could add their name to the long and ignoble list of others who had fired me."

 

In 1982, Lee returned to the San Francisco Bay area and KFOG until 1985 when he got a "nice 3-month contract" at WLVE in Miami. He moved back to Northern California and stayed at KKIS-Concord, KRPQ-Rohnert Park and, by 1992, KYA-San Francisco. He was off to KOOL in Phoenix for big bucks — and 90 days to #1 — in 1994. And then, in 1997, Steve Rivers connected him with KISQ in San Francisco, where he played r&b Oldies for 4.5 years — the longest gig of his career. He is now happily retired in the hills overlooking San Francisco. (Thanks to HollywoodHillGroup.com)

Simon, Cat: KHJ, 1972-73. Cat is self-employed in Internet sales in Phoenix.
Simon, Chris: KFWB, 1986-87; KNX, 1987-92. Chris was the ABC Radio Correspondent in Sarajevo from 1993 through 1998, most recently working for ABC Radio in Moscow, Russia. Chris is now an anchor reporter at WCCO-Minneapolis.
Simon
, Don: KBIG, 1985-96. Last heard, he was working for a Clear Channel station in Indianapolis.

   

(Tom Schnabel, Ken Sparkes, Mort Sahl, and Bryan Schock)

Simon, Jan: KKGO, 1987-89; KFAC, 1989; KKGO/KJQI/KMZT, 1989-2002. Jan left the Saul Levine operation in the Fall of 2002 and now works at the Purdue University station, Classical WBAA-Lafayette, Indiana.
Simon, Jim: KABC, 1970-76; KFI, 1976; KGIL, 1985-88; KKGO, 1991; XEKAM, 1992. Jim died June 6, 1995, of complications from diabetes, an aneurysm and a stroke. He was 61.
Simon, Lou: KKHR, 1983-86; KNX/fm, 1986; KLAC/Fabulous 690, 2004-06. Lou was apd/evenings at Pop Standards Fabulous 690 until an ownership change and format flip to Spanish in early 2006. He's now with Sirius/XM Satellite Radio.
Simon, Perry Michael: KLSX, 1995-96; KLYY/KSYY/KVYY, 1998-99. Perry is a consultant with Allaccess.com and Sabo Media.
Sims, Robert: KABC, 1967-68; KNX, 1968-2002. Bob retired from KNX in April 2002, after 33 years with the all-News station.
Sinbad: KHHT, 2002. Sinbad, the comedian/actor, started in morning drive at "Hot 92.3fm" on February 11, 2002 and left in late summer 2002. He appears on some productions for a reality tv series.
Sinclair, Dick: KIEV, 1950-54; KFI, 1954-68; KIEV, 1968-2000; KRLA, 2001-02. Dick is with CRN Digital.
Siracusa, Tony: KCSN, 1985-87; KNX, 1987. Tony is with the Los Angeles Times Media Group.
Sirkin, Bob: KNX, 2004-05. Bob is a freelance radio/tv reporter. He is based the New London/Norwich, Connecticut area. 
Sirmons, Tom: KNX, 1987-94. Tom is host of Sirmons Sermons blog at tomsirmons.com.
Sisanie: KIIS, 2007-14. Sisanie works middays at KIIS/fm.
Sixx, Nikki: KYSR, 2010-14. Motley Crue's Nikki Sixx joined 98-7fm for a weekend show in July 2010.
Skaff, Ned: KDAY, 1968-70; KFI, 1970-79; KGIL, 1979-92. Ned is the voice of the traffic and parking conditions at LAX.

   

(Martha Shalhoub, Jeff Shade, Diana Steele, Michael Sheehy, and Sandy Shore)

Sketch: KACD, 1996-98; KPWR, 1998-2003; KDLE, 2003. Sketch is imaging for Big Boy.
Sky, Bob: KWIZ, 1975-77; KIQQ, 1986; KLIT, 1990. Unknown.
Skyler, Dave: KTNQ; KHTZ; KIIS, 1988-90 and 1991-92; KKBT, 1990-91; KJLH, 1992-93; KRLA, 1993-96; KACE, 1996; KMLT, 1998-99; KRTH, 2008-14. Dave, also known as Sky Walker, left mornings at KNST-Tucson in early 2006. He's working weekends at KRTH.
Skylord: KLOS, 1990-2011; KABC/KLOS, 2012-14. Skylord, Scott Reiff, reports on traffic from the sky. When Cumulus purchased KLOS and KABC from Citadel, Scott reported for both stations.
Slade, Karen: KJLH, 1990-2011. Karen is the general manager at KJLH.
Slate, Allin: KIEV, 1950-62; KABC, 1963-69; KNX, 1969-78. Allin died, July 21, 2000, at the age of 79. He suffered a stroke in 1990 that slowed him down, "but did not stop him," according to his daughter Lynne Darnell. Allin also had Parkinson's Disease, and it was that to which he finally succumbed. He arrived at KIEV from Honolulu (worked at KULA).In 1964 Allin was sports director of KABC. He joined KABC with the idea of doing an all-night sports show. Instead he captained KABC’s maiden voyage in early evenings. He was told to "talk sports and make it interesting." Guests were hard to come by and it was strictly a raw experiment that developed into "SportsTalk." He worked with Leo Durocher and Jimmy Piersall. Born in Illinois, Allin grew up in L.A. "I was the kid who sat in the bleachers and called the game," said Allin when interviewed for Los Angeles Radio People. He was a radio actor before World War II and worked in radio dramas with Jack Webb. "I was working in the sound and lighting department at the Biltmore Bowl while studying at the Pasadena Playhouse. A waiter suggested that I try radio acting." He became a regular with Keith Jackson on Sports Scoreboard on KABC/Channel 7. Later Allin joined the daily lineup on KNX News radio where he shared his insights and thoughts on the world sports scene. His career had many highlights. He starred as Jason, opposite Dame Judith Anderson, in the Honolulu production of Medea; he was the two-time winner of the Associated Press, Golden Mike Award for excellence in broadcast journalism. He was honored by the Los Angeles Sentinel newspaper for showing fairness and consideration in reporting on the treatment of African American athletes in the Mexico City Olympics. He was also past president of Southern California Sports Broadcasters Association and a long time member and supporter of AFTRA. Allin was a poet, artist and writer with a great sense of humor.

(Hal Smith, Kari Steele, Melissa Sharpe, Charley Steiner, and Kurt St. Thomas) 

SLATER, Bill: KFWB, 1964-65; KRLA, 1965-67; KPPC, 1969-70. Bill died of a heart attack in late October 2002. He was 67.

Bill started out with McLendon Top 40 powerhouse KILT-Houston in 1960. He spent a year at WGR-Buffalo in 1963 before arriving for weekends at KFWB. In 1966, Billboard published the results of the Radio Response Ratings, and Bill tied for top all-night disc jockey in the Pop Singles category. Between KRLA and KPPC, Bill was pd and did the evening shift at Progressive KSJO-San Jose. After KPPC, Bill worked KZEL-Eugene, KZAP-Sacramento and KQFM-Portland. The University of Houston radio/tv graduate returned to his hometown of Victoria, Texas, in the 1980s, and worked radio and tv production. He also restored antique photos at "Custom Copy Photos by Bill Slater." (Photo is courtesy of Bill Earl, author of When Radio Was Boss) 

 

Slater, Jenn: KNX, 2008-09. Jenn reports traffic at KNX Newsradio.
Slater, Julie: KSWD, 2008-14. Julie joined 100.3/fm The Sound in the summer of 2008.
Slattery, Jack: KLAC, 1959. The long-time announcer on Art Linkletter's House Party has passed away.
Slaughter, Paul: KBCA, 1968. Paul lives in Sante Fe and is a highly respected photographer.
Slick, Vic: KRLA, 1984-87 and 1992. Vic works mornings at Oldies KOLA in the Inland Empire.
Slim: KKHR, 1985-86. Slim is living in Phoenix.
Sliwa, Curtis, KABC, 2007-09. His syndicated show ended its run at KABC in late 2009. He did mornings at WNYM-New York and now hosts afternoon drive at WABC-New York.
Sluggo: SEE Doug the Slug.
Smalls, Tommy: KDAY, 1958-59. Known as Dr. Jive, Tommy was implicated with Alan Freed in the payola scandal. He became promotions director at Polydor Records. Tommy died after a short illness in early 1972, at the age of 45.
Smiley, Tavis: KGFJ; KJLH; KKBT, KABC, 1994; KMPC, 1994-95; KCRW and KPCC, 2002-04. Tavis hosted a nightly talk/interview show on PBS until December 2004.

     

(Frazer Smith, Stryker, and Bill Smith)

Smith, Bill: KGIL, 1970-76; KABC, 1980-90; KNJO, 1996. Bill was an on-air reporter at KTLA/Channel 5 until late summer 2008.
Smith, Billy Ray: KXTA, 1997-2003; XERB, 2003-14. The former San Diego Charger linebacker was the co-anchor of morning all-Sports "The Mighty 1090" until the summer of 2012. He returned in early 2013.
Smith, Bobby: KGFJ, 1973. Unknown.
Smith, Calvin: KFAC. Calvin launched his first Los Angeles radio station in 1926 with a $200 investment and introduced KFAC's Classical music format. He and an L.A. High School classmate scraped up $200 and went on the air as station KGFJ. They broadcast only when they had something to say, then went off the air and spent the balance of their time trying to sell commercials so they could resurface the next day. He went to work for KFAC in 1932 as chief engineer and became manager during a difficult Depression-era economy. His first success was the ongoing Southern California Gas Co. two-hour evening concert. The former owner of KFAC died in August 1991. He was 86. 

SMITH, China: KDAY, 1971-72; KRLA, 1972-73; KROQ, 1973-74; KMET, 1974-75; KLOS, 1979; KWST, 1980-81; KMGG, 1983-84; KUTE, 1984-87; KTWV, 1989-91; KAJZ/KACD, 1992-96. KCBS, 1999-2001. China died August 23, 2005, after suffering a fatal heart attack. He was 61. China was one of the big L.A. voices for three decades. Once you heard China’s voice, you never forgot it. It shook the speakers.  

Thomas Wayne Rorabacher was born in Grand Rapids in 1943. In 1969, at KCBQ-San Diego, pd Gary Allyn gave him the name China. The name Smith was picked to give an ethnic balance of exotic and American. Bob Wilson brought China to the Southland to work AOR KDAY from KING-Seattle. China was also an accomplished artist, using his computer to produce fabulous digital pieces.   

The business wasn’t always kind to China. In the Spring of 2003, China fell on hard times and the following story appeared at LARadio.com

This is a difficult story to write. The subject is a nice guy. But his circumstances are uncomfortable. No one wants to write this kind of a story, especially the subject of this story.   

Ten years ago when I naively started researching the first edition of Los Angeles Radio People, I thought of the project as a fun look for some of our early radio people and to learn about their journey. It turned tragic rather quickly. One of the brightest Top 40 stars in L.A. radio was living in a box at Vermont and Hollywood Boulevard. Others had taken their lives or because of a hard lifestyle, life had taken them early. Many had just disappeared.   

It seemed that success came early to our radio people and then circumstances, and now consolidation, have made employment difficult. Many were just not prepared for the eventuality when the microphone would be turned off. Somehow many thought the swirling red light would remain on outside the studio until retirement.   

I found the thrill of those who made it to be exhilarating. I gravitated to those who made lemonade out of lemons. A young David Hall had dreams. Still in his twenties, David was driving his Volkswagen when a drunken truck driver with two loads of cement crashed into his car, and the gas tank exploded trapping him in his car. He lost both legs and within six months was walking on artificial legs. David was given an opportunity at KNX/fm. He loved acting and soon found himself in the role of a double amputee in Gene Hackman’s Class Action (written by LARP Chris Ames), Judge Swaybill in L.A. Law and a ton of cartoon voice work. David is now the coroner in the hugely successful CSI tv series. “Life could be a dream…Sh-Boom.”   

The purpose of this story is a cry for help. One of our own is hurting. He’s a breath away from being homeless. It would be easy to dissect his past and lament at some of the left and right turns he took with his decisions. We could talk about some of his medical setbacks, but this is not about the past. This is about now and very real. He’s ready to go. He’s in the starting block and needs an opportunity to begin the race. He’s been with some incredible stations, yet can’t get a job.  

His name is China Smith and he needs a job or an assignment. China doesn’t want your pity; all he wants to do is pay the rent this month before he gets thrown out on the street. He's already received a notice to vacate and no place to go. Perhaps you can help. He’s not begging. I am. Radio in 2003 is different and there is a new generation. If you have any compassion for those who have gone before you, this is the time for you to reach into your arsenal and help. We all know that times are tough. We all know that jobs are tough to come by. For those who care about the L.A. radio community and the fraternity of 4,000 voices during the past half-century, this is your turn to make an investment.   

And so many of you did help and you made a difference. He was very grateful for the outpouring of love and support. He died following a heart attack in his apartment. China had been in failing health with heart disease and he needed to replace both knees. He continued to smoke until his death.  

(Clayton Sandell, Marco Spoon, Arnie Spanier, and Dr. Laura Schlessinger)

Smith, Dave: KIEV, 1993; KMAX, 1995-96; KWNK, 1996; KIIS/AM/KXTA, 1997-2002; KMPC, 2003-07; KLAA, 2008-09. Dave worked afternoons at KMPC/1540 The Ticket until the spring of 2007 when the station was sold to Radio Korea. He co-hosted morning drive at the Angels station, KLAA, until early summer of 2009. He's now with the NBC Sports Radio Network working weekends.
Smith, Dennis: KBIG, mid-1960s; KBCA, 1969-78. Unknown.
Smith, Frazer: KROQ, 1976-79; KLOS, 1979-84; KMET, 1984-86; KLSX, 1986-97; KLOS, 1997; KRTH, 2002; KLOS, 2014. Frazer works weekends at KLOS.
Smith, Hal: KLAC, 1972-76. Hal is retired and living in Northern California.
Smith, Jack: KLAC, 1957-59. Jack is retired.
Smith, Jan: KWIZ. Unknown.

SMITH, JJ: KNX, 1962; KABC; KPOL; KRLA, 1975; KFI, 1978. JJ broadcast news during his time in the Southland. He was one of the last voices of the original radio network newscasts. JJ died from intestinal cancer on July 28, 2014. in Burbank. He was 88.

As a radio newsman, JJ landed at KNX from WGN-Chicago in 1962, said his longtime friend and colleague, Dave Sebastian Williams. In 1958, JJ became the voice of everything Sears (a total of 26 years) and wanted to move to LA. 

As the story goes, Sears picked up the phone and secured JJ a job at KNX. The Bob Crane Morning Show ('57-'65) was already a fixture at KNX when JJ arrived, handling the morning show newscasts. Later, he replaced Ken Ackerman on the American Airlines Music ‘til Dawn national radio show before moving on to KABC, KPOL and finally KFI.

JJ earned 3 Golden Mike Awards while in Los Angeles.  He retired from his day-to-day newsroom duties as he chose to leave KFI in the late 1970’s while it was a music station. 

Through the 80’s, 90’s and the new millennium, JJ continued to work as a voiceover actor.  He voiced over 1,200 Industrials,  thousands of radio commercials, and hundreds of tv spots.  Beginning in 2005, JJ voiced Chrysler 300 spots for tv, radio, and dealers. JJ Smith's last agent of record was the William Morris Agency.  JJ went on hiatus a couple of years ago to replace one knee and half of another, followed by a hip replacement. JJ turned 88 in early April this year and was optimistically mounting his VO career again when, in late April, he was diagnosed with his illness.

Dave Sebastian Williams remembered his friend:

“In the 70’s, during one of my three stays at KIIS/fm  / KPRZ (K-Praise) my then VO agent and Casey Kasem’s longtime friend / VO agent and former legendary SF Bay Area radio personality, Don Pitts, called me to produce a game show demo for one of his VO clients.  That client was JJ Smith.

From the day JJ and I met we were friends and grew even closer over the years. In the late 70’s, under Biggie Nevins and John Rook at KFI, JJ handled the evening newsroom and on-air duties during my Top 40 music show."

Smith, Jason: KSPN, 2008-09. Jason was part of the ESPN syndicated programming heard at KSPN.

SMITH, Joe: KFWB, 1961. The former president and chief executive of the Capitol-EMI record label produced World Cup USA 1994. As the former prexy of Warner Bros., Elektra and Capitol Records, he has donated recorded interviews with more than 200 top musicians to the Library of Congress. Smith's archives, comprising 238 hours of interviews taped over the course of two years, served as the basis for the exec's book Off the Record, published by Warner Books in 1988.

Joe is also an accomplished pianist. Earl McDaniel remembers introducing Joe in Japan in 1947. Joe started as a dj in Boston before becoming a weekender at "Channel 98."

Joe left KFWB in August 1961, refusing to cross the picket line. Only Joe and Ted Quillin did not return to KFWB after the strike. He commented on leaving his on-air career: "I felt an insecurity in the talent end of the business. The emphasis had shifted from individual personalities to a station's sound."

Born in 1928, Joe rose through the ranks of Warner Bros. Music, beginning in 1961 when he was national promotion manager. He was responsible for signing and developing the careers of such artists as the Grateful Dead, James Taylor and Jimi Hendrix. By 1966, he was gm of the label. At Capitol he helped revive the career of Bonnie Raitt. He has served as president and ceo of Warner/AMEX Cable's sports entertainment.

In 1975, Joe was made Elektra/Asylum Records chairman of the board. In 1993, he became executive producer of entertainment activities for World Cup USA 1994 - the world's soccer championship.

Smith, Ken: KGFJ, 1986. Ken is part of Bayley Productions.

(Ruth Seymour, John Summers, Hanna Scott, and Dred Scott)

Smith, Matt: KROQ, 1994-2005; KLAC, 2005-13. Known as Money at KROQ, Matt was part of the LA Lakers broadcast team and he co-hosts an afternoon drive show at KLAC.
Smith, Milton: KJLH, 1992. Unknown.
Smith, Pete: KNX; KDAY, 1956-58; KRKD, 1958-61; KNOB; KPOL; KMPC, 1961-88; KJQI/KOJY, 1993-95; KGIL, 1998. Pete was part of "Music of Your Life."
Smith, Stephen A: KSPN, 2007-09; KLAC, 2009-10; KSPN, 2011-13. Stephen's syndicated show was heard all-night at all-Sports KLAC until late December 2010. In 2011, he joined KSPN and the ESPN network.
Smith, Steve: KNX. The president of the Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles died in April 1998 at the age of 38. Steve, who had suffered from AIDS, committed suicide. Until overcome by his illness, he had been editorial director for KNXNewsradio.
Smith, Steven G.: KLOS, 1977-98; KPLS, 1998-2000. Steven is working in Orange County.
Smith, Dr. J. Thomas: KJLH, 1970-72; XPRS, 1972; KDAY, 1975-77. J. Thomas replaced Wolfman Jack at XPRS. He graduated in 2000, earning the Juris Doctor degree, from Texas Southern University - Thurgood Marshall School of Law. He is associated with the law firm of Anderson & Smith, P.C., and operates a mental health consulting practice in which he provides administrative and clinical consultation and training.

 

(Brad Samuel, John Santana, Jan Simon, Walter Sabo, and Don Savage)

Smith, Wallace: KUSC, 1972-96. Wallace is the general manager at WLIU-New York.
Smithers, Ray: KPOL, 1978-79; KMPC, 1980-81. Ray is active in the voiceover world from Florida.
Snakeskin, Freddy: KTNQ, 1977-78; KWST, 1978-79; KROQ, 1980-89; KOCM/KSRF, 1991; KROQ, 1990-93; KCBS/fm, 2006 - 14. Since July 2006, Freddy has been with CBS/LA. He started as a writer and production guy and now schedules the music for JACK/fm. Freddy handles all the programming and music for KROQ-HD2 (the Roq of the 80s).
Snoop Dogg: KPWR, 1995-2000; KKBT, 2000-01. The hit recording artist aired a syndicated show at "The BEAT" until the spring of 2001.

SNOW, Jack: KMPC, 1993. Jack, the former Ram, teamed with Chris Roberts briefly on the all-Sports KMPC. Jack died January 9, 2006, at the age of 62, of complications from a staph infect. Snow had been in critical condition since shortly before Christmas." He battled his illness with great courage and tenacity," said Steve Savard, the Rams' radio-play-by-play broadcaster for the past six seasons who became close friends with his partner. "He was an inspiration to everyone around him, including his doctors and nurses. Jack's family appreciates all the support and love St. Louis fans showed him during his illness."

Snow broadcast his last game on November 20. He intended to work the Rams' game November 27, in Houston, but became too ill to go on the air that day. He returned to St. Louis with the team after that game, and immediately was hospitalized. His condition eventually improved and he was able to move to a rehabilitation facility. However, he took a turn for the worse shortly before Christmas and he was readmitted to the hospital and was unable to recover.

Snow remained fiercely loyal to the club through the years, to the point he sometimes drew criticism for sticking up for players through lean times.

Snow had double hip replacement surgery in 2005, having the operations done simultaneously so he would be ready when training camp began in July. He thought the deterioration of the joints was related to his long football career.

"I was talking with the doctors, and the amount of running you do - the hips were both ground down to nothing," he said at the time. "They weren't a ball, they were just flat on the top. The area the round ball sits in was all screwed up." Snow recovered and was back in the booth for the first broadcast this season. Snow's doctors didn't think the development of the staph infection was connected to those surgeries, although a hip is one of the places the infection eventually hit.

Snow was a standout receiver for the Rams from 1965-75, finishing fifth in the NFL in receptions (51) in 1970 and ninth that season in receiving yardage (859). Steve Futterman said that Jack was always a great guy to talk to in the Rams press box. "He made what has to be one of the greatest fingertip catches of a Roman Gabriel touchdown pass against the Baltimore Colts in 1967," remembered Futterman. Jack's son is former Angel J.T. Snow.

Snow was drafted out of Notre Dame in 1965 by Minnesota, but the Vikings traded him to the Rams, for whom he played his entire 11-season NFL career. He was selected to the Pro Bowl in 1967. Snow was the Rams' receivers coach in 1982 and eventually moved into the club's broadcast booth, and came with the club to St. Louis when it left Los Angeles in 1995.

Snow was an all-city baseball and football player as a high school student in Long Beach before heading to Notre Dame. He made the varsity as a sophomore in 1962 as a backup and punter before eventually blossoming as a senior, when he caught 60 passes (second in the NCAA) for 1,114 yards and nine touchdowns and was a first-team All America selection. He finished fifth in balloting for the 1964 Heisman Trophy, which was won by John Huarte, the quarterback who threw him the ball.

Snow was born January 25, 1943, in Rock Springs, Wyoming. He graduated from Notre Dame in 1965 with a degree in psychology.

Snow, Kat: KNAC, 1982-85. Kat was there for the rock 'n rhythm format at KNAC and became Killer Kat when the station changed to Pure Rock. She was married to KRLA's Lee Duncan. Kat is working on a book, raising her granddaughter Genesis Duncan, does volunteer work for her school, freelance research and voiceovers.
Snow, Tony: KFI 2005. Tony hosted a weekend show at KFI. He went on to be the White House press secretary to George Bush beginning in May 2006. After some challenges with cancer, Tony left the White House in the fall of 2007.Tony died in July 2008.
Snyder, Jack: KEZY/fm, 1973-77; KMET, 1977-82; KLOS, 1984-85; KMET, 1985-87; KLSX, 1991-92. Jack is working as an artist manager in New Orleans while still recovering from Hurricane Katrina.
Dupre. He still lives in New Orleans and is happily married.
Sobel, Brad: SEE Sandy Beach
Sobel, Carol: KFWB, 1968-74. Carol publishes a monthly 32-page magazine on the law of entertainment.
Sobel, Ted: KNX, 1987-90; KMPC, 1990-93; KFWB, 1994-2014. Ted broadcasts sports at News/Talk KFWB. From 1995-2000, Ted was the play-by-play voice at KLAA of the Long Beach Ice Dogs of the now defunct International Hockey League
Solari, J.A.: KMET, 1968-69; KLAC, 1969; KYMS, 1970; KPPC, 1970-71. A.J. is in the produce business in the Bay Area.
Sotelo, Eddie ‘Piolin’: KSCA, 2003-11. Piolin started morning drive at Spanish KSCA on February 3, 2002.
Somers, Steve: KMPC, 1981-82. Steve is midday co-host at WFAN-New York.
Sommers, Bill: KHJ, 1970-73; KLOS, 1973-96; KABC/KDIS/KLOS, 1997-2001. Bill retired from his post as general manager of KABC/KDIS/KLOS/KSPN August 24, 2001.

SOMMERS, Dale: KLAC, 2002-04. Dale hosted the all-night syndicated Trucking Bozo Show until he retired in the Spring of 2004. Dale died August 24, 2012, at the age of 68.

The program originally started as a Country Music program in 1984 and evolved to a Talk and Caller Participation show. The  line-up of affiliates was primarily a number of 50 thousand watt stations that covered most of the Eastern half of the United States and KLAC was their first really true venture into the western USA." For two decades, Dale was true to the format of a program that catered to truckers. The program was a hoot. Every caller seemed to have a more bizarre handle. They talk about gasoline prices, per mile hauling fees, characters on the road, and the lonely life of a trucker.

Dale did not retire lightly. He had three minor strokes in 1993, which affected his short-term memory. “It really stripped me of a lot of my confidence after that,” said Dale. He hoped that by getting back to a semi-normal routine with plenty of rest, by sleeping normal evening hours, he would take some of the stress off his back. Dale also suffered with Addison's Disease. “The Addison's is under control as long as I take the steroid injections as prescribed and the diabetes is doing a lot better now that they have taken me off of the oral steroids.”  


When Dale lost a good friend, Waylon Jennings, he wrote: “I didn't even know he had diabetes, but for various reasons, it took his life. Could he have been in denial about his disease? I don't know but there are so many of us who have this disease and we tend to brush it aside. For the most part we don't feel any different than everybody else. If we have too much to drink at a party, we may get sick but we are inclined to say that, 'I could handle the booze much better when I was younger, age is catching up with me.' No, it's not the age that is catching up with you, it is the diabetes that is destroying your body in rapid fashion.  “I check my blood sugar up to 7 times a day and, yes, my fingers hurt but I fight like hell to keep my blood sugar under control 'cause if I don't, I will not live to be 69 or maybe even 65. I am pleading with all my friends in the broadcast community to please see your doctor if you have any of the symptoms I outlined earlier and if you do have diabetes.” 

Dale concluded: “Learn to control it or it will control you and destroy your life. It doesn't care if you’re young or old, black or white, or anything else. It is a deadly disease that can be kept under control and you can live a fairly normal life. Mary Tyler Moore is a perfect example of what I am speaking of, but Mary had kept her diabetes under control for many years and you see the results, but don't kid yourself by thinking that diabetes will not take Mary from us someday, because it will, but due to her vigilance it will most likely be later. If just one person reads this and discovers that they have diabetes and then goes about controlling it and extending their life, it will be a perfect Christmas for me.” 

Dale made headlines in 2002 when he broadcast the information on the car that the Maryland/DC/Virginia snipers were driving and one of the truckers just pulled into a rest stop and spotted the car and he said he called 911 and was told to block the entrance with his semi. Many said that if it wasn't for the Bozo they would have gotten away.

Sommers, Steve: KLAC, 2004. Steve hosted the all-night Truckin' Bozo Show. He's now retired.
Sondoobie: KPWR, 1998-2000. Sondoobie worked at "Power 106" from the group Funkdoobiest until the summer of 2000
Sontag, Frank: KLOS, 1985-2012; KKLA 2013-14. Frank hosts an afternoon show at Salem's KKLA. He was with Mark & Brian at KLOS until the team disbanded in the summer of 2012.

SORKIN, Dan: KHJ, 1965. Dan ‘s major success in radio came at KSFO-San Francisco, during the glory years. He was on KHJ briefly before the station flipped to “Boss Radio” in 1965.

Dan founded Stumps'R Us, an organization of amputees that would share success stories of how they coped and did so with humor and courage. Dan lost his own leg in 1964. “I stupidly took a perfectly good motorcycle off the highway at 100+ mph and broke my back and almost every bone in my body. My left leg was pulverized, and the surgeons didn't have much success in fixing it. When I learned they wanted to experiment by taking bone grafts from other parts of my body, I asked to have the offending limb removed so that I could get on with my life.

Dan went on to earn a certified instrument flight instructor's certificate and a commercial license and eventually was hired on as a corporate pilot. Dan flew for the corporation for 15 years, became chief pilot and retired in 1989, when he founded Stumps 'R Us. In his spare time, he teaches computer technology to retirees in Rossmoor in Walnut Creek.

Soto, Henry: KKGO, 1986-91. Unknown.
Soto, Michael: KNAC, 1975-77; KWST, 1977-78; KNAC, 1978-79. Michael is vp/director of national sales and marketing for GST Corporation (parent company is the NYK Steamship Line) based in Los Angeles.
Soul, Johnny: KGFJ, 1968-72; XPRS, 1972; KGIL, 1971-73; KDAY, 1974-76. Born Ron Samuels, he lives in Texas and owns The Samuels Company. He's on the U2 video for Stuck in Time and Ron's got an active voiceover business.
Soul Assassins: KKBT, 1998-2000. Louis (B Real!) Freeze and BoBo hosted a Friday night show at The Beat.
Southcott, Chuck: KGIL, 1962-75; KBRT, 1980; KPRZ, 1983; KMPC, 1988-92; KJQI/KOJY, 1992-95; KGIL, 2009-11. Chuck works at KGIL.
Southcott, Karl: KKLA, 1987-94. Karl is program director of the Adult Standards format at Dial Global.
Southern, Jim: KAPP, KOPP, 1964-65. Born Jim Pritchard, he is in semi-retirement living near Portland.
Sovel, Mark: KDLD, 2003-06. Mark was the music director at Indie 103.1.

   

(Stew, Mike Siegel, and Bob Scott) 

SPANGLER, Dick: KFWB, 1964-66; KBBQ, 1966-67, nd; KGIL, 1968-80, nd; KBLA, 1991-92. For a quarter of a century “Spangler’s World” was part of radio’s landscape. In 1970 the LA Times' Don Page named "Spangler's World" the Best Interview Series: "A gem of an interview series provides in-depth profiles of extraordinary perception."

Long recognized as “one of America’s ten best interviewers,” his series was produced under his Spangler’s World Communication banner and was syndicated across the country.

Dick was born at West Point Military Hospital in New York and as an “Army brat,” attended 14 schools before graduating from high school. He then went to the University of Hawaii and, at 18 years old, began his radio journey by teaming with Don Berrigan for the “Dick and Don Show,” a “minor sensation” on KHON. He moved solo to KORL-Honolulu. “I was America’s stunt dj for a while. I set the world record for underwater broadcasting, a world bowling record, raced speed boats, flew planes, M.C.’ed ‘Best Tan’ contests on Waikiki Beach...all in the name of better ratings and advertiser promotion. I suppose the craziest was broadcasting among 16 sharks (underwater kind) at Hawaii Marineland. I also did my show for two weeks dressed as an Indian Chief while living in a tepee.” In 1960 at KELP-El Paso he set a trampoline bouncing record and in another stunt, as a cowboy, rode a horse from Mexico to the radio station.

His world travels gave him the opportunity to learn a half-dozen languages and he attended the University of Mexico in the 1960s. “While studying journalism and drama at the San Fernando Valley State College, I interned at KFWB and quickly became a special features reporter and anchorman.” Dick later won just about every award in California radio, including five Golden Mike awards. His book, Kung Fu: History, Philosophy & Technique, is still selling as a trade paperback. His new book, in progress, is based on his provocative interviews with America’s best authors.  Dick has served as president of many local trade organizations. As a financial news anchorman, he was part of the launch of all-Business KBLA on April 17, 1991. His communication company produces radio/tv business programming, commercials and infomercials.

Spanier, Arnie: KCTD, 1999-2000; KXTA, 2000-2002. Arnie left the Dallas Cowboys stations in late spring 2012.
Sparkes, Ken: KGBS, 1969-71. Ken owns a production company and is the voice of news/talk TCN/Channel 9 in Australia.
Spears, Gary: KYSR/KIBB, 1996-97; KIIS, 1997-2004; KBIG, 2004-07. Gary started afternoons at KBIG in early summer of 2004 and left in the spring of 2007. He's now part of Classic Hits, K-Hits in Chicago.

SPEARS, Michael: KHJ, 1977. The former pd at KHJ died October 25, 2005, at the age of 58. Michael, former program director at Top 40 KHJ in 1977, was known as Hal Martin early in his jocking career at KLIF-Dallas and CKLW-Detroit. He was a three-time winner of Billboard Magazine's "Station Of The Year" award, and also winner of "Program Director Of The Year" two times (once while he was helming KFRC-San Francisco and once in Black radio. He is the only Anglo ever to achieve this honor). Last year, Michael was inducted into the Texas Radio Hall of Fame. 

At 19, he was working nights at KLIF while attending SMU. When he left his on-air jock life for one of programming, “Hal Martin” disappeared. When he left KHJ, Michael went on to purchase with partners Tampa Bay's first all-Talk radio station, WPLP. He owned the station four years prior to joining the Fairbanks Group as national pd. In 1978, Michael launched New World Media, a radio programming service. 

During his career, he programmed WYSL-Buffalo, KFRC, and KNUS-Dallas (first fm station in Dallas). As programmer at KKDA (“K104”)-Dallas for eight years, Michael achieved enormous success with the Urban station. Michael was in the television business for two years syndicating two national programs: The Beam, a black entertainment and music show and Youth Quake, which were on the USA Network. In 1992, Michael left Dallas to program WPNT-Chicago, a Hot AC station. He left in the summer of 1994 and returned to the city of his greatest success to be operations director of News/Talk KRLD-Dallas. Late in his career, he owned The Beam, a media company that produced and syndicated both tv and radio programs.   

“Michael was always in love with radio and the illusions radio can create,” commented Charlie Van Dyke. “Perhaps that is due to the fact that he was also an accomplished magician as a young guy. He was passionate about radio and had boundless energy. We both shared a McLendon DNA and, of course, the experiences of Drake and RKO. Fellow Texans, we grew up with the same appreciation of radio performance and the radio artists who fueled our desire to go into the business. Michael [or Hal as I first met him] went at it with everything he had. I'm told that's also how he approached his final battle with cancer. A friend who saw him last week said that he was at peace with his life and with God. He made his mark, helped people along the way, and always looked for the positive. Michael Spears was a good man and I am happy that I knew him. Rest, my friend.”

Spears, Russ: KHTZ/KRLA/KLSX, 1983-93; KSCA, 1996-97; KKLA/KRLA, 2001-07; KFWB, 2007-14. Russ worked at Metro Traffic Network until the fall of 2008 following a company downsizing. He's now heard on KFWB dispending traffic information.
Spencer, Raymond: KGBS, 1973. Raymond died May 25, 1987, in San Bernardino after a two-year struggle with kidney cancer. 

SPERO, Stanley: KFAC, 1951-52; KMPC, 1952-97. Stan, one of the giants in Southern California radio for a half century, died July 15, 2006, from complications of a blood disorder. He was 86. He was general manager at 710/KMPC during its MOR glory years. “Stan Spero was one of the greatest salesmen I ever met, but he was a man of integrity,” said Johnny Grant after learning about Stan’s death. “You could go to the bank on his word.” Johnny said that Stan loved counseling young radio people. “Stan Spero’s influence will be around L.A. radio for a long time,” concluded Grant. 

“Stan was a superb radio guy and he meant the world to me,” said Wink Martindale. “He was my choice to be first speaker for my Walk Of Fame star installation. It was Stan who gave me the opportunity to be a part of the KMPC lineup where I was thrilled and pleased to work for him and Gene Autry a total of twelve years. 

“Stan has been a close friend for almost 50 years,” emailed George Green, former gm at KABC. “We first met when Stanley was running perhaps the most legendary station in Los Angeles, KMPC. I was a young sales manager in 1965 making my national sales calls. And I remember meeting Stanley in the lobby of the United Airlines agency, Leo Burnett. I was schlepping a heavy briefcase up to the agency and Stanley was without a briefcase looking very dapper in his suit. I asked Stan where his briefcase was and he pulled out a rate card from his suit jacket and held that up to me. This is it. Of course, there was a standing line to get on KMPC.”  

Green continued: “KMPC was a fabulous radio property and Stanley did a great job as its manager. KMPC was THE station serving the L.A. community. It never changed as long as Stan was in charge. Stanley never changed in his devotion to the LA community. To this day he served on the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce. And to this day he was the only general manager who has been invited to serve as a permanent honorary member of the Southern California Broadcasters Association. His devotion to the community and his family and friends is unmatched.” 

Green said that Stan had a love for sports, especially the Anaheim Angels. “He has been a continuous fan for as long as the Angels have played baseball. He traveled down to Anaheim, even when he was working for KABC, who handled the Dodgers. Such devotion. Even when I managed KMPC I was reluctant to drive that distance. Stanley loved the drive, the ball team and his two wives who were so devoted to Stanley and his interest levels. When his first wife Fritzy Spero died he was lucky to have found another sports fan with his wife Harriet. He has always been quick to say that he was so lucky to have been in love with Fritzy and now to have found a second love, Harriet Spero."

"Yes, Stanley was a good friend," continued Green. "There has rarely been a week that Stanley didn’t call and ask how I was doing. He did that with all his close friends. Loyal, devotion and love was what Stanley offered. And talk about being smart and knowledgeable about sports. Don’t try to stump him on who was playing for the Angeles, the Rams (when they were here) or UCLA football or basketball. His mind was clear as a bell. It was his body that gave out first. Everyone who knew Stanley Spero will miss him greatly. To have had him as a close friend was an honor to me and many others.

“It is my great pleasure and honor to call Stan Spero a mentor and dear friend for nearly forty years,” wrote his long-time friend Ken Miller. “The radio industry will long remember ‘Day Cruiser 10’ with tremendous respect for all of his innumerable contributions to sports broadcasting, charitable causes and quality programming.”

"Here's the kind of man Stan Spero was," wrote Dan Avey. "Stan, as gm of KMPC, the Gene Autry flagship for Angels baseball, had to fire Don Wells from the Angel baseball broadcast to make way for Dick Enberg. When he called Wells in to his office to tell him, Stan then told Don he had a job, starting the next Monday, doing sports at KFWB. How many bosses felt so bad about firing you that they went out and got you another job? Stan Spero reeked with integrity. God bless him!"

Stan started his 40+ year career in sales at KFAC, moving to KMPC two years later and staying 42 years. When Stan stepped down as gm in 1978, he took over as parent Golden West's vp in charge of sales for its sports division. In the mid-1990s he was senior sports consultant to KABC/KMPC. Stan was born and raised in Cleveland Heights, Cleveland, Ohio and came to the Southland to study at USC. He received a B.S. degree in business administration. 

Spiker, Dave: KYMS, 1976-82. Dave owns Imagination Media in Lynden, WA.
Spinderella: KKBT, 2003-06. Deidra Jones is the sexy dj of the Grammy award winning female trio Salt N' Peppa. She worked afternoons at "the BEAT" with A-1 until early 2006. She was working at an Urban station in Dallas until March 2011.

SPIVAK, Joel A.: KLAC, 1965-68. Son of big band leader Charlie Spivak, Joel distinguished himself as a talk show host and news commentator. One of his fellow workers at KLAC said of Joel: "What a wonderful guy. He arrived in Southern California from the East. He got off the airplane with an umbrella, wearing spats, a fedora hat, tight, close-fitting suit and narrow tie. He was a bit out of touch but within a month of his arrival, everyone loved him."  

His radio career began quite unintentionally when he took a temporary job at a local station while attending the University of North Carolina. He came to KLAC following five years at KILT-Houston and four at WPRO-Providence.  

When Joel left the Southland he could be heard over the next decade in Philadelphia and Washington, DC. During his time in the nation’s capital he was called a "moderator, catalyst, interviewer, and devil's advocate." 

Joel died of lung cancer on March 4, 2011, at his home in Virginia. In a 1990 interview with C-Span, he said radio was more fun than television. "You don't have the time constraints that you do with television. People have more fun listening to the radio because they can see anything they want to see. . . . It's a very personal medium." 

Since 1996, he had worked against tobacco use and was a spokesman for the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

Spoon, Marco: KJLH, 1980-90. Marco hosts the Quiet Storm at "Majic 102"- Houston.
Springfield, Dan: KHTZ, 1984. Dan has an active voiceover career in San Diego.
Squirle, Julie: KROQ, 1978-79. Julie is a litigation attorney in Northern California.

   

(Dave Sebastian, Melissa & Jim Sharpe, Jim Severn, and Matt Smith)

St. Clair, Dick: KFI. 1976. Unknown.
St. Claire, Chuck: KCBH, 1968. Chuck is a project coordinator for Salem Communications and lives in Northern California.
St. James, Scott: KMPC, 1979-82; KMGG, 1984; KMPC, 1991-92 and 1995; KCBS/fm, 1995-2004. Scott is a Hollywood actor and host of a tasty blog.
St. James, Tony: KYMS, 1969-70; KWIZ, 1970-74; KWOW, 1974-78; KIQQ, 1978-85. The native Philadelphian teamed at KIQQ in morning drive with Bruce Chandler for close to five years until the station changed format to "Lite-100," the satellite-delivered Format 41. In 1987, he went to work at Unistar and was the original night jock on AM ONLY. He had a very lucrative voiceover career and his campaign for Coors Extra Gold provided the down payment on his house. Tony died April 22, 1990, at the age of 42 from complications following a perforated ulcer.
St. John, Geoff: KPWR, 1993-95. Last heard, Geoff was working at KYLD-San Francisco.
St. John, Gina: KYSR, 1993-95. Gina co-hosted E! News Daily for many years.
St. John, Jon: KRTH, 2006-07. Jon was working swing at K-EARTH until early 2007. He has since provided the voice for numerous video game characters, most notably Duke Nukem and Big the Cat and E-123 Omega from Sonic the Hedgehog.
St. Regis, Lisa: KHHT, 2010-14. Lisa works weekends at HOT 92.3. 

St. THOMAS, Bobby: KBLA, 1966; KFWB, 1967. Bobby, born Thomas C. "Tommy" Roche, passed away suddenly on September 17, 2012, in San Diego. He was 78.

He was born on April 20, 1934, and grew up in New Haven. Tommy joined the U.S. Navy during the Korean war,
serving as a hospital corpsman and prosthetic technician. Upon discharge from the Navy, he attended the University of Connecticut at Storrs. While at UConn he was active on the campus radio station WHUS as radio personality, special events director, producing remote broadcast from various campus events and jazz concerts. He also was play-by-play announcer for all UConn basketball and football games. These experiences led Tommy to enter the broadcast industry.

In 1965 he worked as half of the Murphy & Harrigan team at KLIF-Dalls. He lived most of his life in San Diego (KCBQ and KFMB) and worked under the name Thomas Murphy.
(Artwork courtesy of Bill Earl)

St. Thomas, Johnny: KRLA, 1979-85; KKLA, 1985-88. Since 1988, Johnny has been selling insurance. He also worked as John Newton.
St. Thomas, Kurt: KROQ, 2009-12. Kurt is a weekend fill-in joq.
Staab, Rochelle: KIIS, 70s. Rochelle was program director at KIIS. She recently published a mystery novel.
Stack, Bill: KFWB, 1983; KMDY, 1985-86; KNJO, 1986. Bill is now working for the State of California as Emergency/911/Public Safety Dispatcher.
Stacy, Rick: KYSR, 1995-96. Rick is the program director for XM's '80s at 8' channel.
Staggs, Brad: KGIL/fm, 1987. Brad works on camera on several of the Home and Garden tv shows. Brad lives in Nashville.
Stanfield, Ray: KLAC, 1966-69; KGBS, 1970-74. The former gsm at KLAC in the 1960s and gm of KGBS in the 1970s , Ray grew up in Greenville, South Carolina, and started his radio career in his hometown at age 16. After two years in the Navy, serving in the Pacific after the war, he returned to work in Greenville and eventually joined Metromedia. Before arriving in the Southland, Ray worked at a rep firm and managed KMBC-Kansas City. Bill Ballance’s "Feminine Forum" and the creation of the Hudson & Landry morning team were launched under Ray’s watch. After leaving KGBS in 1974, Ray became a radio station broker in Southern California. He died after a two-year battle with colon cancer. After leaving KGBS, Ray became a radio station broker in Southern California. Ray passed away April 24, 1999, at the age of 71.

STANLEY, Chris: KNX, 1998-2007. Chris died June 9, 2012, of an apparent heart attack. He was 64.

Chris Stanley joined KNX in December of 1998 as an anchor/reporter and left a decade later.

In his fourth decade of broadcasting, he began his career as a Top 40 dj at WGBT in Goldsboro, North Carolina. Later, during the Vietnam War he was with Armed Forces Radio in Thailand, and afterwards he went from being a disk jockey to news reporter at WIVK and WNOX in Knoxville, Tennessee. He worked at various radio stations in Wisconsin before moving to Houston in 1975 where he became news director at KPFT/fm. He subsequently produced syndicated news and entertainment programs such as "The Daily Planet" and "The Planet," in San Francisco, where he and the late Steve Capen had a popular morning show on KSAN. He went on to produce "Direct News" in New York where he was news director at WPIX/fm from 1980-82.

He joined the CBS Radio network in 1982 and worked there for 16 years as an anchor/reporter. Other areer highlights include a Peabody award for his 1979 series on the Jonestown massacre and covering six political conventions, especially in 1996 when he was on the campaign trail with Pat Buchanan and Robert Dole. He then joined the CBS Radio Network as an anchor/reporter before coming to Los Angeles and KNX. Chris attended Pepperdine University.

Stanley, Lisa: KRTH, 2002-14. Lisa joined morning drive as the entertainment contributor at "K-Earth" in July 2002.

     

(Ed Salamon, William Shearer, and T.J. Simers)

Stark, Mike: KNAC, 1990-94. Since 1995, Mike has been the West Coast producer of the Tom Joyner Morning Show. He also owner/operator of the LA Radio Studio (laradiostudio.com).
Starling, David: KFI, 1940, 1971; KFAC, 1972-88. David, a seasoned broadcast pioneer who began his career in the Southland, died February 22, 2000, of a heart attack in Los Angeles. Born in Middletown, Ohio, David came to the Southland to attend UCLA where he graduated in 1936 with a pre-legal degree. It was accidental that he got into radio. While working in a little theater a fellow actor suggested he join his group doing radio shows. This led David to a three-decade run with KFI as news director, editorial director, program director and production manager. He was the announcer for "Hit the Road," "Ladies Day" and reading the Sunday comics from the LA Times on the air every Sunday morning. Some twenty years later he hosted at KFI and KFAC over 2,000 90-second programs called "A Word on the Presidency," "Energy" and "A Word on Tomorrow." Since retiring he worked quite a few Los Angeles County Fairs and taught in a local radio school. "I have enjoyed the days spent, able to do what I liked, but I haven't forgotten it was tough going when trying to get a start," David told me when researching my book. He was 84.
Starr, Bob: KMPC, 1980-89. Bob was the play-by-play broadcaster for the Rams and the Angels. He was brought in from KMOX-St. Louis where he had been the voice of the St. Louis Cardinals for eight seasons. He had two stints as the announcer for the California Angels. During his first tour he worked with Ron Fairly and then left to broadcast Boston Red Sox games, returning in 1993. Bob started his sports broadcasting career in the mid-1950s. Bob died August 3, 1998, at the age of 65.
Starr, Steve: KPFK, 2002-05. Steve was a host and general manager during his time with the Pacifica station. He's working on film and technology projects.
Steadman, Bill: KNX, 1957-60. Unknown.
Steal, Jimmy: KPWR, 1999-2014. Jimmy is program director at "Power 106" and in the fall of 2000 he was promoted to regional vp of programming for Emmis Communications.


STECK, Jim: KRLA, 1964-67. Jim arrived in the Southland from KACY-Oxnard and was a newsman during the era when KRLA brought the Beatles to L.A. conducting many of the interviews with the Fab Four. He is remembered for boarding a plane with Dave Hull to interview the Beatles before the plane took off. When he left the Southland he went to the Bay Area and worked for KCBS and KTVU/TV. Jim eventually spent time in Hawaii. In 1993, it was discovered that Jim had an inoperable brain tumor. A colleague noted, "He had humor all the way through till his death." 

Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1935 he branched out in the mid-1960s and combined his radio work with a stint on Teen Scope, a public affairs show aimed at the Los Angeles teen audience and aired on KCOP/Channel 13. Steck, a Korean War veteran, died on September 27, 1990 and was buried at the San Francisco National Cemetery. (Thanks to Bill Earl for the artwork)

Steckler, Doug: KLSX, 1997-2005. Doug worked evenings with Tim Conway, Jr. at KLSX until late Spring 2005. He now appears with Conway at KFI on Friday nights.
Steele, Dave: KPOL, 1977-78. Dave worked afternoons at KPOL. Unknown.
Steele, Diana: KKBT, 1989-98; KHHT, 2003-07; KRBV, 2008; KSWD, 2011. Diana joined mornings at V-100 (KRBV) in January 2008 and left when Radio-One sold the station to Bonneville in April 2008. She works weekends and part-time at 100.3/The Sound.
Steele, Ed: KIEV, 60s. Ed, who was working at KPLM-Palm Springs, died in a gas explosion in his Desert Hot Springs home.
Steele, The Real Don: KHJ, 1965-73; KIQQ, 1973-74; KTNQ, 1976-77; KRLA, 1985-89; KODJ, 1990; KCBS, 1992; KRTH, 1992-97. Born Donald Steele Revert on April Fools Day, 1936, he attended Hollywood High School. Don was the original afternoon drive "Boss Jock" at 93/KHJ. and was voted one of the Top 10 personalities during the second half of the 1900s. The Real Don Steele died of lung cancer on August 5, 1997.
Steele, Gregg: KNAC, 1991-95. Gregg is VP/Music Programming at Sirius XM Satellite Radio.
Steele, Kari: KOST, 1999-2001; KBIG, 2001-11; KOST, 2011-14. Kari works middays at KOST.

 

(Sluggo, Stephen A. Smith, and Nikki Sixx)

Steele, Michael: KDLE, 2004-07. The former music director at KIIS/fm was appointed pd at "Indie 103" on January 1, 2004. He left Indie in February 2007. In the fall of 2012, he joined Northern Lights Broadcasting/Minneapolis as director of ops and pf of Hot AC KTWN (K-Twin 96.3).
Steele, Mike: SEE Mike Sakellarides
Steele, Shadow: KQLZ, 1989-91. Last heard he was writing for Hits magazine.
Steele, Sharon: KEZY, 1992-93. Sharon was working evenings at Westwood One's Hot Country format.

(Michael Soto, Phil Shuman, Steven Sellers, and Paul Sunderland)

Steele, Shaune McNamara: KHJ, 1977-80; KHTZ, 1980-84; KHJ, 1984-86; KRLA, 1987-90; KLSX, 1990-92; KRTH, 1992-93; KCBS, 1993-94. Shaune was music director for many leading rock stations. She is documenting, archiving, presenting and preserving the radio legacy of her late husband, The Real Don Steele.
Stein, Jim: KUSC, 1969-72. Jim is a Chicago native. He co-hosted The Stein and Illes Show on KUSC and went on to become a tv writer/producer for 30 years, winning 2 Emmy awards in partnership with Bob Illes. Jim produced Howard Stern's Son of the Beach show. 
Stein, Les: SEE Les Crane
Stein, Mike: KRHM, 1959. Unknown.

 

(Bob Shannon, Maria Sanchez, Stanley Sheff, Rick Scarry, and Tracy Simers)

STEIN, Alex "Sleepy": KNOB, 1957-66. "Sleepy," the founder of the Southland's first all-Jazz station KNOB, died July 27, 2000.

Born in Savannah, the son of a news service executive, he grew up in Miami and Havana and graduated from the University of Havana with a degree in languages. He worked in New York and Chicago radio in the '40s. Stein got the name "Sleepy" when he replaced an all-night dj in Chicago named "Wide-Awake Widoe," according to the obit in the LA Times.

He came to the Southland to work at KFOX from Phoenix where he programmed KARV. In 1957, he bought KNOB and began all-Jazz programming. Stan Kenton helped him finance the station by contributing the profits from his band's appearance at the Rendezvous Ballroom in Balboa. In the early '60s, Sleepy hosted a radio show three nights a week from Strollers, a club in Long Beach, with live performances by players like Chico Hamilton. He sold the station in 1966 and started a firm called GROUP LA, which sold time on several fm stations in the Southland. He eventually left the broadcasting business and became a stockbroker. "Sleepy" died of cancer at the age of 81.

Steinbrinck, Bob: KMPC 1972-92. Bob lives in the Inland Empire and writes for the local newspaper.

(Saint John, Gianna Suter, Tony St. James, and Doug Stephan)

Steiner, Charley: KFWB, 2004-07; KABC, 2007-11; KLAC, 2011-14. Charley joined the Dodger broadcast booth in late 2004.
Stench: SEE Mike Roberts
Stephan, Doug: KRLA, 2002-03; KPLS, 2003; KFWB, 2008-14; KLAA, 2009. Doug's syndicated show airs on the weekend at KFWB.
Sterling, Philip: KCSN. Philip hosted "Goldensterling," a weekly two-hour program that aired on KCSN. He died from complications of myelofibrosis, a bone marrow disease, on November 30, 1998. He was 76.
Stern, Heidi: KBIG, 1998-99. Heidi is working in San Diego.
Stern, Howard: KLSX, 1991-2005. Howard joined Sirius Satellite Radio in early 2006. He's also a judge on America's Got Talent.

 

(Tracie Savage, Laurie Sanders, and Tori Signal)

Stern, Kevin: KUSC, 1969-71; KIQQ, 1974-79; KCSN, 1974-81; KGBS/ KTNQ, 1977-80. Kevin owns California Auto Repair in the San Fernando Valley.
Sternberg, Ira David: KWIZ, 1968-70; KOST, 1971-73. Ira owns a PR agency in Las Vegas and hosts a weekly talk show at: kunv.org.
Sterns
, Deloy: KWVE, 2005-08. Deloy worked afternoon drive at KWVE.
Stevens, Andy: KEZY, 1988-94. Andy has been the announcer for ESPN's American Muscle Magazine for most of the nineties. He's now working as a computer programmer/analyst consultant for an international consultancy firm based in Atlanta. 

STEVENS, Bill: KUTE, 1973-79, pd; KKGO, 1983-86; KRTH, 1991-2003. Bill was born and raised in Montebello. He started his radio career in 1964 at KRFS-Superior, Nebraska, and went on to KODY-North Platte, KUDO-Riverside, KFXM-San Bernardino, KLOK-San Jose, KYNO-and KFIG-Fresno in 1971 as pd.

He was pd of KUTE during the disco era and described the station at the time to the LA Times: "Although we identify ourselves as a Disco station, I think it's altogether appropriate for us to play a ballad every once in a while. You have to break it up. You can't run on 140 beats per minute for 24 hours."

In the early 1990s he sailed his small boat around the Pacific to Tahiti, Marquesas, Bora Bora, Samoa and Hawaii. In 1991 he worked as pd at a small island station, WVUV-Pago Pago. Bill has done many films and his tv credits include the part of Dr. Forbes on the CBS soap Young and the Restless.

In 1992 when Brian Roberts left "K-Earth," Bill moved into the overnight slot. He relates well to the nocturnal hours. "Overnights on KRTH was the best job in radio!" 


Stevens, Bill: KUTE, 1973-79; KKGO, 1983-86; KRTH, 1991-2005. Bill left K-EARTH in early 2005.
Stevens, Bob: KNX, 1985-88. Unknown.
Stevens, Edwin J.: KFAC. Ed is deceased.

STEVENS, Greg: KQLZ, 1992-93, pd. Greg "Stevens" Straubinger arrived at "Pirate Radio" from KGMG ("Rock 102")-San Diego and replaced Carey Curelop. He teamed with Steven O. Sellers and they billed themselves "The Rude Boys." The "Guitar-Based Rock" format was beginning to see ratings success when Viacom bought the station in the spring of 1993 and changed it. Greg aired the last show on "Pirate Radio" with gm Bob Moore, and they played Another One Bites the Dust by Queen, The Traveling Wilburys' End of the Line and Guns N Roses' Welcome to the Jungle, which ironically kicked off the format in 1989.

Greg was born in Buffalo and was exposed to not only the big personalities in Buffalo but at night he could tune in the Chicago voices. In 1975 Greg graduated from Ithaca College cum laude with a B.S. degree in radio and tv. He worked for a half dozen Buffalo stations while in college and after graduation he started at WBBF-Rochester followed by “13Q”-Pittsburgh. Greg shifted from Top 40 to AOR to work mornings at WQXM and WNYF-Tampa and KEGL-Dallas. His first pd job was in 1982 at KISS-San Antonio, where he met his 11-year morning partner, Sellers. They moved the "Rude Boys" show to KCFX-Kansas City in 1986 and a year later to KGMG.

In the spring of 1993, Greg returned to San Diego and dropped his on-air work to program KIOZ. "My first interest in radio came when my dad took away my night-light (age 6 or 7) but still allowed the glow of the lighted radio dial. I pretended to sleep, but stayed up listening for hours." Greg has a wife and teenage son and says he hopes to retire in San Diego "in about 20 years from now if my luck hold out!" Since the mid-1990s, Gregg has worked at KIOZ, KQRC-Kansas City, KEGL-Dallas, and WHTQ-Orlando.

In 2009, he went to Webster University in Orlando to earn a master's degree in Marketing. He's currenty Associate Course Director at Full Sail University in Winter Park, Florida

 

(Charlie Seraphin, Richard Saxton, Johnny Soul, and Dave Symonds)

Stevens, Jay: KRLA, 1969-72; KROQ, 1972; KIIS, 1972; KKDJ, 1973-75; KIIS, 1975-77; KGIL, 1978; KRLA, 1986-87; KMGX, 1990; KRLA, 1992-93; KRTH, 1993-2003. Jay retired in late summer 2003.
Stevens, Jackie: KJLH, 1989-97. Unknown.
Stevens, Jan: KFWB, 2005-09; KNX, 2010-14. Jan was an anchor at all-News KFWB until a format flip in the fall of 2009. She is now an anchor at all-News KNX.
Stevens, Jeff: KNX, 1997-98; KABC, 1998-2001. Jeff broadcasts traffic from Metro Networks and is a teacher.
Stevens, Julie: KJOI, 1989. Unknown.

STEVENS, Kris Erik: KKDJ, 1973-74; KIQQ, 1974-75; KGBS, 1975; KIIS, 1975; KCBS, 1991-92.  Kris became a legendary success almost overnight as the youngest Rock radio personality in Chicago, and was presented with Billboard Magazine’s ‘Radio Entertainment Award’ for his exemplary on-air talent while at WLS-Chicago, a 50,000 watt flamethrower with a signal that covered 46 states at night. During his brief but celebrated radio career, he was consistently rated #1 on major market stations like CKLW-Detroit, WMYQ-Miami, WCFL-Chicago, WQXI-Atlanta, and KKDJ and KIIS/fm.

Seeking a new challenge, he opened Kris Stevens Enterprises, an LA-based Broadcast Creative Services company specializing in advertising, recording, imaging, and syndicated radio programming. The firm began winning awards for their innovative Radio/TV advertising expertise and celebrity driven radio specials featuring the biggest movie and rock stars. Stevens conceptualized and hosted "Entertainment Coast to Coast" and won the Gold Medal Award for "Best Entertainment Radio Program" of the year which aired on the CBS Radio Networks.

In 1990, Kris added another dimension and dream for many broadcasters: station ownership. He bought his first radio station, WFXD-Marquette, Michigan and ran it remotely from LA. Other career highlights include hosting Drake/Chenault's "History of Rock-and-Roll. He credits his voiceover skills as the key ingredient to his career success. Over the years his voice work has been heard on commercials for Heineken, Mercedes Benz, LifeLock, Wall Street Journal, Wells Fargo Bank, Delta Airlines, Pontiac, Starbucks, Orkin Man, AMC Theatres, US Marines, AT&T, promos for all the major networks. Kris has voiced trailers for all the major studios. For decades he has been the signature voice for leading stations across the country.

As the host of Movie Tunes for 10+ years, he’s heard in thousands of movie theatres across America prior to show time. Internationally, he hosts various Christmas Radio Specials for the Voice of America each holiday season. His website is: kriserikstevens.com. 

Stevens, Les: KKDJ, 1974. Unknown.
Stevens, Matt: KXTA, 1997-2003. The former UCLA quarterback from 1983-86, Matt was part of the Bruin broadcasting team. After a bout with testicular cancer, he now broadcasts UCLA pre-game shows on XTRA Sports. Matt is general manager of the Los Verdes public golf course.
Stevens and Grdnic: KWST, 1979-80. They have a widely syndicated comedy service. They are based in St. Louis.

 

(Pete Smith, Greg Simms, Ryan Seacrest, Frosty Stilwell, and Jan Stevens)

Stevens, Richard: KRTH, 1989-91. Richard is working at Cumulus as a syndicated radio host.

STEVENS, Shadoe: KHJ, 1970; KRLA, 1970-73, pd; KROQ, 1973-74; KMET, 1974-75; KROQ, 1976-80. The oldest of five kids, Shadoe was born Terry Ingstad in 1947 in Jamestown, North Dakota, and became a weekend deejay at age 11. He studied art at the University of Arizona and did on-camera announcing at a Tucson tv station. Majoring in Commercial Art and Radio/TV Journalism at the University of North Dakota and the University of Arizona, he put himself through college working in radio at KILO in Grand Forks, North Dakota, KQWB in Fargo, North Dakota, and KIKX in Tucson. Even then, described as a workaholic and overachiever, while going to school he worked full-time at the stations and appeared in university plays on weekends. He worked at WRKO-Boston before arriving in the Southland.

In addition to his activities at KRLA in 1972, Shadoe produced, narrated and syndicated "The Greatest Hits of Rock 'n' Roll." By the end of the year he had stepped down as pd and remained as a jock.

While at KMET in 1974, he was the pd and midday jock; he left in 1975. Shadoe described his station as being "for this age and beyond. Theater of the mind. No formulas. We are satirical in nature." 

He was Billboard magazine's Personality of the Year in 1975. He returned to KROQ to do weekends in 1976 with Sparkle Plentee and was a programming and production consultant in 1978 through his company Big Bucks.

In the early 1980s, Stevens was bigger than life as the spokesperson Fred Rated, the bearded tv spokesman for the Federated Group, selling discount stereo equipment. One of his most celebrated tv spots for Federated stated, "Rabid frogs ate our warehouse, so we're passing the savings on to you." Fred Rated then announced "RabidFrog Bonanza Days" as hundreds of rubber frogs bounced around the tv screen. After the first weekend of the campaign, sales increased 500%. In four years, the group grew from 14 local stores to 78 superstores in 5 states. The success of the Federated advertising campaign was extraordinary. It was the first regional advertising campaign ever to have received a 2 page spread in Time magazine.

This commercial success led to being the announcer on Hollywood Squares in 1986. The producers experimented with putting Shadoe in a celebrity square occasionally, and the appearances escalated, giving him national exposure. In 1988, Shadoe took over the American Top 40 countdown show and became only the second host of the program. Watermark spent $1 million to promote Shadoe and by 1994, AT40 had been discontinued in the United States.

Shadoe became a regular on tv's Dave's World. He was the first program director of "World Famous" KROQ/fm. He appeared on Midnight Special where he was a correspondent, giving artist backgrounds and doing celebrity interviews with major rock groups. He appeared in the movies: The Kentucky Fried Movie, TRAXX, Mr. Saturday Night, and the much revered Bucket of Blood for Roger Corman.

From 1995to 2005, Shadoe hosted Rhythm Radio, which aired in 30 countries. Another syndicated show he hosted, Top of the World, was on in 25 countries from 2006-09. Since 2011, Shadoe does Mental Radio on SiriusXM.

Stevenson, Al: KTYM. Unknown.
Stevenson, Verne: KCBH; KMLA. Unknown.
Stew: KNAC, 1994; KLOS, 1994-2011. Stew is in charge of production at KLOS.

(Jerry Sharell, Dr. Adele Scheele, Larry Santiago, and Curtis Sliwa)

Stewart, Bill: KMPC, 1951-59; KGIL, 1965-66; KRHM, 1966 and 1969; KGIL, 1973-75. He was the Bill of the KMPC jingle..."Ira, Johnny, Bill and Dick!" In 1962, Bill was president of Albums, Inc. For Armed Forces Radio he hosted "A Quarter Century of Swing." In 1969, the 30-year veteran was honored with a concert at the Palladium. For 20 years he did in-flight airline music programming. Bill died in 1993 of congestive heart failure.
Stewart, Guy: KDAY, 1974-75. Unknown.
Stewart, Hank: KBCA. Unknown.
Stewart, Jill: KFI, 2002-03. Jill is an award-winning journalist and she was a fill-in host at KFI. Her columns appear in the LA Daily News, OC Register and SF Chronicle. JillStewart.net
Stewart, John: KKLA, 1988-93; KBRT, 1993. John hosted "Live From LA" on Christian KKLA. He's now a lawyer in Orange County
Stewart, J. Michael: KEZY, 1970; KKDJ, 1971-72; KYMS, 1973-74; KWIZ, 1985-87. Also known as Jason Stone at KEZY, Stewart is a vacation consultant for the Hilton, Marriott and Planet Hollywood in Las Vegas. He's also producing a multi-media project for business and visitors to Vegas.
Stewart
, Peg: KFI, 1997-2000 and 2001-07; KBIG, 2002-04. Peg is a weekend news anchor at KFI. She is lead instructor at the radio broadcasting program at Fullerton College and pd at KBPK.
Stewart, Ralph: KTWV, 1991-2003; KCBS, 2005-14; KCBS/KTWV, 2014. Ralph is operations manager at JACK/fm and he was appointed program director at KTWV in June 2014.

 

(Dean Sander, Bob Starr, Daron Sutton, Ralph Stewart, and Jack Silver)

Stewart, Rick: KEZY, 1976-78; KODJ, 1989-91; Westwood One, 1991-93. Rick has a successful career in video and film production in Southern California. 
Stewart
, Suzanne: KLSX, 1989; KLOS. Unknown.
Stewart, Zan: KBCA, 1977-80; KCRW, 1980-82. Zan was a longtime jazz writer for the LA Times and recently retired from the New Jersey Star-Ledger.
Stiles, Sue: KFWB, 1978-2009. Sue is a crew member at Trader Joe's.
Stilwell, Frosty: KYSR, 1998-99; KLSX, 2000-2009; KABC, 2009-10; KFI, 2010-11. Frosty joined Frank Kramer and Heidi Hamilton at KLSX in the fall of 2000 until 2.20.09 when the FM Talk Station flipped to AMP RADIO. The trio joined KABC on October 5, 2009 and left a year later. He did a weekend show at KFI until late spring of 2011. He went on to co-host mornings at Star 101 (K101)-San Francisco. In the early summer of 2013, Frosty joined San Francisco Talker, KKSF (910AM).
Stoltze, Frank: KLON; KPFK, 1992-2000; KPCC, 2000-11. Frank is a reporter at KPCC.

STONE, Bob: KGRB, 1965-67 and 1972-73; KWST, 1973-78; KGRB, 1978-89; KKGO, 1989-90; KGRB, 1990-93; KJQI/KOJY, 1993; KGRB, 1994-96. Bob, mostly associated with the Big Band era of KGRB (West Covina), died October 19, 2011. He was 73. Bob had stage four breast cancer. He was treated for that and a year later went to the doctor for therapy treatment and they discovered the cancer had spread to his lungs, kidney, liver and his heart.

While Bob was in the U.S. Coast Guard School of Electronics in Groton, Connecticut, his commanding officer suggested that he had a voice for radio. Once out of the service in 1960, Bob secured his first radio job in his native San Francisco at KHIP. In the early 1960s he joined CBS Films in New York. Bob returned to California in 1963. He worked at KFMX-San Diego and KGUD-Santa Barbara (which he left after the station was burned to the ground) before starting on KGRB. Between 1967 and 1972 he was at KCRA-Sacramento. During his career he remembered an unusual job: "I was the voice of Kmart for many years." Bob's last stop at KGRB was as transitional gm during the sale of the station.

Stone, Bonnie: KBIG; KACD; KSCA, 1995-97. Bonnie joined Fox Sports.
Stone, C.J.: KYSR, 1992-95. C.J. worked at Dial-Global until late summer 2009.
Stone, Cliffie: KFVD, 1940-44; KFI, 1950s; KPAS/KXLA, 1952-59; KFOX, 1959-65; KLAC, 1973-78. Country Music Hall of Fame member, L.A. radio personality, singer, songwriter, bandleader and producer of more than 14,000 tv and radio shows. Cliffie died of heart failure on January 16, 1998. He was 80.
Stone, Dave: KABC / KSPN, 2001-06. Dave was part of the morning drive show at KABC and co-hosted afternoons at KSPN Sports. He died at the end of 2013.
Stone, Gary: KSCA/KLVE, 2000-10. Gary retired in late 2010.
Stone, Greg: KLOS, 1993-94. Unknown.

   

(Linda Salvin, Perry Simon, Gregg Steele, Ed Shane, and Jill Stewart)

Stone, J.B.: KHJ, 1974-77; KGFJ, 1980-81; KJLH, 1982-84. Last heard, J.B. was working at "Magic 97" in Albany, Georgia.
Stone, Jay: KNX/fm, 1971. Jay, born Jack Spaw, died in a one-car crash October 15, 2001, in Hawai'i Kai. "He was really a total radio nut," said long-time friend and radio consultant Jerry Clifton. "He worked long hours and his mind was in it all the time." Clifton said Stone was a jokester who would find a way to make any situation funny. "He would have probably made a joke out of this," Clifton said. Jay was program director at KNX/FM in the early 1970’s. He was killed when his car flipped and hit a tree on Haha'ione Road. Police say speeding was involved and Stone was not wearing a seat belt. Clifton said Jay, whom he had known for 30 years, was moving to the Las Vegas area to be near his family and was probably late for his flight when the accident happened. "He was excited about moving near his son," Clifton said. "He was real positive about the move and in one of those places in his life where he was moving to a whole new mission. I talked to him the night before and said goodbye, but I didn't think that would be the last time I would ever talk with him." Jay and former KROQ dj Mike Evans went to high school together at North Torrance. “He did mornings at several stations including WNBC in New York,” emailed Mike. “The past 14 years, he’s been in Hawaii - we did mornings together at I-94 and KIKI. He was most recently fired from his gig doing mornings and station manager at the Oldies station, KGMZ, in Honolulu. His father was Jackie McCoy, a world famous boxing trainer [in boxing’s Hall of Fame] who had several championships, including Little Indian Red Lopez. Jay Stone's hero was Soupy Sales and Jerry Lewis and he acted like them both - a very funny guy,” Mike said. He was 55.

(Nicole Sandler, Cliffie Stone, Sinbad, and Spinderella)

Stone, Jefferson: KEZY, 1976. Unknown.
Stone, Sebastian: KHJ, 1966. Sebastian was Johnny Mitchell at KGB-San Diego before he joined "Boss Radio." He was at KFOG-San Francisco in 1976 and was pd of KFRC-San Francisco. Sebastian died of a heart attack in 1987.

STOREY, Roy: KFI, 1972-73. Roy spent one season as the Kings television/radio play-by-play man in 1972-73 with Dan Avey. Roy died April 17, 2012, after a lengthy illness, in Desert Hot Springs. He was 85. His call of “Shot On Goal!” reverberated in the Bay Area, LA and San Diego for three decades.

Roy was in between the first play-by-play announcer in Kings history, Jiggs McDonald, and the current voice of the Kings, Bob Miller.

The former broadcaster for the California Golden Seals began as the announcer for the Los Angeles Kings in 1972. He was a news anchor and sports director of KYA-San Francisco and formerly "the voice" of the San Francisco 49ers alongside Bob Fouts. When he left the Southland he joined the old World Hockey Association Mariners in San Diego. The club terminated operations there prior to the league merging with the NHL in 1979.

A native of Grand Rapids, Storey's long career included stints behind the microphone for major league baseball. He also served as the radio announcer for hockey games at the 1960 Winter Olympics at Squaw Valley and was the voice of Saint Mary’s College basketball for many years. In addition, he was a news anchor at KYA in the 1970s.

Storey, Tom: KJOI, 1974-81; KOST, 1977; KMPC, 1981-82; KZLA, 1981-87. Tom is an airborne traffic reporter for KFWB and other Southern California stations.
Stradford, Mike: KKBT, 1990. Mike was pd at KKBT. Unknown.
Strasser, Teresa, KLSX, 2006-09; KABC, 2010-11. Teresa was part of the Adam Carolla morning show at the FM Talk Station until a format flip to AMP RADIO on 2.20.09. She co-hosted the morning KABC show with Peter Tilden until late summer of 2011.

 

STRATTON, Gil: KNX, 1967-84 and 1986-97. The longtime sports broadcasting icon died October 11, 2008, of heart failure. He suffered a heart attack two months before his death and he seemed to be making a recovery with active participation in physical therapy. Gil was 86.

Born in Brooklyn, his early career was as an actor appearing on Broadway with Judy Garland, Mickey Rooney and Elizabeth Taylor. In the movies, Gil appeared with William Holden in Stalag 17 and with Marlon Brandon in The Wild One. He was an umpire for baseball's Pacific Coast League and coined the term, "I call 'em like I see 'em" and took the line into his broadcast career at "The Big News" during the 60s and 70s on KNXT/Channel 2. He was heard on KNX for decades. To horse racing fans, he was a fixture at local tracks doing the announcing for the weekly horse races that were broadcast on national tv. His ubiquitous sports broadcasting career included the Los Angeles Rams with Bob Kelley.

 

KNBC/KFWB sports anchor Bill Seward sat with Gil during the year before he died. Bill paid great respect to his mentor in this interview: 

“When I was a kid I loved getting the mail from the mailman,” remembered Gil. “I was named a junior and I would see something for Gil Stratton in the mail and of course I opened it. My father said I was not Gil Stratton, I was Gil Stratton, Jr. ‘And don’t open my mail.’ It was that way until I was about to open on Broadway and they asked me how I wanted to be billed as Gil Stratton or Gil Stratton, Jr. I said bill me as Gil Stratton, Jr. I did it really just to show my father and then it just kinda stuck. Particularly after World War II where I primarily made my living as a radio actor the junior part would lead to what part I played on the show. They would read all the parts and if there was a kid’s role and they saw junior they would pick me and it stayed with me all that time.” 

Gil grew up in Brooklyn and Garden City, Long Island, spending his time equally between the two cities. “My dad was in the printing ink business. He manufactured printer’s ink.” Gil remembers his father receiving a holiday or birthday card and spitting on his fingers and then rubbing the ink on the card and invariably say, “cheap ink on this one.” 

A long-time sports fan, in 1940, Gil saw 77 home games at Ebbets Field. “Somebody in our apartment had a pass and all it cost me was a ten-cent tax plus a nickel each way on the subway. In 1941, the Dodgers won their first pennant in 25 years. I saw the only game that the Dodgers won in the 41 World Series. They beat the Yankees 3 – 2 in Yankee Stadium in Game 2 on October the 2nd,” said Gil. 

Acting came easy to Gil. He was in all the school plays. “It was something I did easily and I guess fairly well because I was busy doing those things,” Gil reminisced. “I used to do summer stock in the Brighton Theatre, which is right near the start of Coney Island. It was a legitimate theatre and a girl I went to high school with had gone on to the American Academy. She was in Brother Rat and I went down to see her. I had spent a year in military school, so I had the uniform on. Saw the matinee and went to dinner with the whole cast and we can back and they thought it would great idea to put me on stage because I was in uniform, just like they were on stage. That was probably my real stage debut.” 

The following summer he was offered a role in Atlantic City for $5 a week. His parents drove him down and he got a room in the YMCA for $2.75 a week. “I used to go out on the boardwalk and get a nickel’s worth of Jujubees to kill my appetite.” 

Gil played on Broadway as one of the leads in Life With Father. Two years later Gil had the lead in Best Foot Forward. “This led to a contract with MGM and I headed West, young man. World War II had started and when I got there I had to go to my draft board because we were going out of town for a production in Chicago and you couldn’t leave the state without going to the draft board. This was August and I asked what they thought and they said I would be carrying a gun by the first of October.” (Gil in Girl Crazy)Standing in front of the draft board building with some other guys, Gil was asked if he knew about the Air Cadets. “It is the Air Force and if you could qualify for it for bombardiers and things like that and pass the written and physical there is no place to put the guys right now so you can stay out longer, so that’s why I did it. I opened at the Airliner Theatre in Chicago and after passing the exams, they asked if they could swear me in on stage after a matinee. A Major came down and swore me in. I got the call the following March but we hadn’t finished filming yet and I got a deferment until July, so it was almost a year from the time I signed up before I went in.” 

“I ended up flying in B-17s and one night we were on a night training navigation mission over Little Rock, Arkansas when they lost two engines on the right side and we were losing altitude over the Ozarks Mountains and the pilot said, ‘Okay, boys, prepare to bail out.’ I snapped on my parachute and I was the first one out. It was kinda like the big hill on a big roller coaster. I jumped, pulled the handle on the rip chord, and nothing happened. I later learned there was a three-second delay between pulling the handle and the parachute opening. It feels like a lot more than three seconds when you’re looking at it and nothing is happening.” 

Gil was discharged from the Air Force on October 5, 1945. “The thing you wanted more than anything else was a civilian suit. The first job I got was in Chicago. The William Morris Agency was my agency at the time and they thought of me primarily as a Broadway actor. I got involved in a radio show and shortly after joining them they moved it to the West Coast. I really wanted to come back to Hollywood any way I could and that worked out great.” 

From 1946 to 1954, Gil made his living primarily as a radio actor. “I was on Lux Radio Theatre 29 times. Meet Corliss Archer, the Life of Riley and on and on. I was Margie’s boyfriend on My Little Margie with Gale Storm and Charlie Farrell. I was a regular on Junior Miss and then we did a television show called, That’s My Boy, which had been a movie with Martin & Lewis. I played the Jerry Lewis part. Everything was fine for the first 13 weeks and then we went up against George Gobel. After 13 more weeks nobody ever heard of us again.” 

Beginning in 1954 and up until the late 1990s, Gil fulfilled the final third of an incredible three-career life. “I was a sports announcer, mostly at CBS,” recalled Gil. He was doing My Little Margie and went to visit his friend Tom Harmon who anchored a coupled of the tv sportscasts. Tom mentioned that he was going to be leaving the late news at Channel 2. His wife had put her foot down and told Tom that he had to choose between the two newscasts. I told him that’s what I wanted to do since I was eight years old. He told about an audition and when I showed up about half of the guys on the Rams team were auditioning along with most of the sports writers in town. I got the job.” 

Busy with his radio acting, Gil was also a professional baseball umpire for ten years beginning in 1947. “I spent five years in Class C baseball; so I did pay my dues. I finally ended up in the Pacific Coast League. I could have done that as a career.” 

When Gil joined KNXT/Channel 2 the tv news had revolving anchors. “We called them the Bum of the Week. The first one was a cowboy actor and he couldn’t even pronounce President Roosevelt, so he was on his way out. Even Bill Stout was an anchor for awhile and he hated it. It was kind of different and it finally shook down around 1960 with The Big News. It became the all-time biggest television news shows in history. We used to get 21 – 23 ratings on that show.” 

About five years after joining KNXT/Channel 2, he started doing sports broadcasting on KNX. “It happened when George Nicholaw took over as general manager. He was smart enough to recognize the pull and success of The Big News and its people. He proceeded to put all of us from tv on radio. Bill Keene and I used to the sports and weather together and we kind of kidded each other as we went along. More people came up to us and said they enjoyed what we did on radio, more so than on television.” 

Did Gil enjoy radio or tv more? “Television was meant for me,” Gil responded without pausing. “It was that kind of medium. Having been an actor I was loose in front of the camera. I don’t mean that as conceit, it is just kind of like I am. On the radio you are reading everything word for word. When I was a radio actor it was the best job I ever had. I can’t think of anything easier. That was the best job we ever had. The Lux Radio Theatre paid $133. That was scale. That was a lot of money back in those days.” 

The sports scene in L.A. helped glorify the period for Gil’s reporting. “Remember John McKay was winning the college football championships at USC. John Wooden was winning the college basketball championships at UCLA. The Lakers were winning. The Dodgers were winning. There were 50,000 people on a Saturday afternoon at Santa Anita. This was the sports capital of the world, without a doubt. And it is no longer.” 

Gil carries a money clip with a Rams helmet embedded on it, which reminds him of a special time when he was part of the Rams broadcasts. “The Rams were an institution. They came out here from Cleveland in 1946. It was a big deal. We had two of the greatest quarterbacks in football – Bob Waterfield and Van Brocklin. Other players like Elroy Hirsch on the end. Ollie Matson came later. He was in a deal for 11 men. There was also Tank Younger and Jon Arnett. It was wonderful. I can remember 100,000 people in the Coliseum for the Chicago Bears games. It was a great rivalry. Everyone was a fan. I was fortunate to be their play-by-play on television for a few years and I certainly enjoyed it.” 

For 20 years Gil hosted the Saturday broadcasts that originated at great race tracks in the West. “It was a very popular show on the West Coast,” said Gil. “We covered races from Canada to Mexico and went as far East as the Rockies. It was on the Pacific Coast Network, which consisted of 34 tv stations. I don’t think there was a bar or a country club or any place where people gathered that they didn’t watch that show. When I would go to one of these other markets they treated me like Frank Sinatra had just come in. What was strange was that I didn’t like horse races. I never did like it and I’m not a gambler. I was lucky to have a partner who really knew everything. He was a real race tracker. I studied so hard to be prepared for that show and people really got the impression that I knew what the hell I was talking about and that was not true.” 

“I broke my wrist when breaking a horse out of the gate, which resulted in wearing a cast. I would only let jockeys sign the cast. I turned down all the baseball or football players. Only jockeys could sign it. I think that had something to do with the popularity of the show because I was so accepted by the jockey colony. My size also worked for me because they were used to six foot two guys who were leaning down. I could look eye to eye with most of the jockeys. Consequently I had very good rapport with them. I enjoyed them but I can’t say I enjoyed going out to the track. I looked forward to it every week because I got paid well.” 

Gil remembers the times that he would be walking around the track area and fans would come up to him asking for a tip on a winning horse. He would ask which race. They would say the fourth race. He would tell them horse #4 looked good, or if it was the sixth race, he would say the number six horse. If the horse won the race they thought he was a genius. If the horse lost, they just wouldn’t ever ask again. “I didn’t know one horse from another,” confessed Gil. 

In 1953, Gil had a major role in Billy Wilder’s Stalag 17 starring William Holden and The Wild One with Marlon Brando, two of the most successful films of the 50s. “Stalag 17 was like being in the prison camp. It really was. The director’s assistant acted like a prison sergeant and he would yell at us to get our asses on the set. After a few weeks on the set it really did feel like we were in the service because you are in uniforms all day long.”

Gil revealed that he partied hard during much of his incredible career. “I was part of it all for a long time and finally I joined AA and that seemed to get me straightened out and from there on there were no problems.” 

Stratton, Ric: KUCI, 1978-79; KOCM, 1980. Ric is vp/sales at Southland Communications in Van Nuys.
Straw, Tom: KMPC, 1981-82. Tom has moved into television. He received two Emmy nominations for Night Court and he was executive producer on Dave's World. He's currently involved with the Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson.

(Neil Saavedra; Shirley Strawberry; Tony Scott; and Ted Sobel)

Strawberry, Shirley: KKBT, 1990-2005; KDAY, 2006-09; KJLH, 2009-11. Shirley was one of the "Angels" on the Steve Harvey morning show. She left the station on May 20, 2005, when Harvey exited the station. She rejoined Harvey when his syndicated show was picked up by KDAY.
Street, Commander Chuck: KIIS, 1983-2012. Chuck has been the pilot for KIIS Yellow Thunder traffic helicopter for over 20 years. He got his job by flying his helicopter past the 11th floor Hollywood studios while Rick Dees was on the air. Sitting next to Chuck was a female companion - a topless female companion. His reports also air on the KTLA/Channel 5 Morning News.
Street, Dusty: KWST, 1977; KLOS, 1978; KROQ, 1979-86; KMET, 1986-87; KROQ, 1987-89; KLSX, 1990-94. Dusty is working for Sirius out of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland.

STREIT, Steve: KBIG, 1997-99. Steve was program director at KBIG until late October 1999. He is founder of Green Dot, a pre-paid credit card business, based in the Southland.

The former pd of WASH/WGAY-Washington, DC, WMGF/WJRR-Orlando, programmed three stations in West Palm Beach before joining KBIG. He brought to KBIG his role as a strong turnaround executive at numerous major market adult contemporary stations including WMGF-Orlando, K101-San Francisco and WASH-Washington, DC, which was nominated for The Marconi Award's AC Station of the Year and WGAY in Washington, D.C. Prior to joining Chancellor, he was the group pd for Paxson Broadcasting in Orlando.

Strobel III, John W.: KRLA, 1960; KMPC; KNX, 1969-75. John retired from broadcasting in 1987. After that he produced 27 educational film strips for Walt Disney Educational Materials Company and produced and filmed a number of industrial documentaries. He's completed a novel, Winds of Horror.

STRODE, Tollie: KBCA, 1962-72; KAJZ. Tollie was born and raised in Birmingham. Growing up, he always had an interest in music and entertainment, according to his son, Tollie, Jr. 

After service in the Army in the early 50s, he returned to Birmingham and opened a night club, the Down Beat. He later moved to Los Angeles, following his older brothers.  Eventually, he married his hometown sweetheart, Lillian. They established a family and remained in LA until his death.   

Tollie brought an East Coast flavor to his music presentation on Jazz KBCA. Known as a jazz purist and for his many contributions that helped make jazz a strong genre and market force in the LA scene, with sayings such as "Straight Ahead, Slow Traffic To The Right." 

After radio, Tollie turned his attention to real estate. 

He lost his battle with cancer on January 18, 2001. He was 71.

Stroka, Mike: KPPC, 1964-66. The former general manager of the underground station has passed away.
Stryker, Ted: KYSR, 1996-98; KROQ, 1998-2009; KLSX/KAMP, 2009-10; KROQ, 2010-14. Stryker hosts afternoon drive at KROQ. He was the dj on The Ellen Show for one season.
Styble, Bryan: KIEV, 1989-90. Bryan is a long-time talk show host in Seattle. He now write a media blog.
Styles, Dave: KIIS, 2003-14; KBIG, 2014. From Northwest radio, Dave worked the all-night shift at KIIS/fm, as well as weekends. In early 2014, he joined MY/fm for afternoon drive.
Stuart, Linda: Linda broadcasts traffic on KABC weekends via Metro Traffic. During the week she does fill-in news and traffic shifts for KABC, KPLS, KOLA, KJLH, and the Highway Stations in Barstow.
Stuart, Rick: KROQ; KNAC, 1986. Rick is working at KFOX iin San Francisco/San Jose.
Sturgeon, Wina: KFWB. Wina is a sports reporter for the Salt Lake Tribune.
Sudock, Mark: KLON, 1970-84. Mark is a video production editor at KTTV/Fox 11.
Suits, Bryan: KFI, 2008-13; KABC, 2013-14. In early 2010 he returned to his home in Seattle and continued with a weekend show on KFI until moving to KABC in late 2013.

 

(Jill Schary, Mark Savan, Art Schreiber, Charlie Sergis, and Gary Spears)

Sullivan, Alex: KNX, 1968-2004. Alex, a graduate of Harvard University, retired from radio in the Fall of 2004.
Sullivan, Chuck: KFOX, 1969-71; KLAC, 1971-80; KREL, 1971-72. Chuck was living and working in Hot Springs, Arkansas. He died in 1993.
Sullivan, G. Michael: KEZY, 1977-80; KWIZ, 1980-87. Michael is the manager of the Monterey County Fair.
Sullivan, Joe: SEE Joe Collins
Sullivan, Kathleen: KFWB, 1999-2000. Kathleen mysteriously walked out on her morning drive co-anchoring job at all-News KFWB in April 2000 and never returned. In 1984, Sullivan became the first woman to anchor a telecast of the Olympic Games. She sits on the SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration) Advisory Council, to which she was appointed by the White House in January 2003. Kathleen live in Rancho Mirage.
Sullivan, Paul: KNAC, 1976-78. Paul is executive vp for Global Media based in Vancouver, BC.
Sullivan, Pete: KZLA, 1980. Unknown.
Sullivan, Tim: KLAC; KHJ, 1973-79; KWST/KMGG, 1981-82. Tim is owner of KCAL/KOLA in the Inland Empire.
Summer: KCAL, 2006-07; KYSR, 2007. SEE Summer James
Summers, Bob: KBCA, 1973. Unknown.
Summers, John: KWOW, 1983; KWDJ, 1983-84; KDIG, 1984-87; KBON, 1986-90; KFRG, 1993-94; KLAC, 1999-2001; KHTS, 2006-09. John was morning host at KHTS-Santa Clarita until early 2009. John is now news director at Reno's #1-rated 50,000-watt conservative news/talker, 780-KOH.
Summers, Karen: KOST/KFI, 1984. Karen lives in Ventura.
Summers, Nick: KTWV, 2004-05. Nick is production manager at RM Broadcasting, Palm Springs.

 

(Karl Southcott; Tony Sandoval; and Lily Sheen)

Summers, Scott: KWST, 1981. Scott arrived in the Southland from KFRC-San Francisco. In the 1990s he worked at Shadow Traffic services. He died in January 1995 of complications resulting from a kidney transplant.
Sumner, Kevin: KYMS, 1995. Unknown.
Sunderland, Paul: KLAC, 2002-05. Paul was the LA Lakers play-by-play announcer after Chick Hearn died.
Sure, Al B: KHHT, 2007-09. The Grammy-nominee r&b singer (five number one r&b hits) joined HOT 92.3 in the summer of 2007 and left in the spring of 2009 following a Clear Channel downsizing.
Suter, Gianna: Gianna is an update anchor for Fox Sports Radio, traffic reporter for Metro Networks, and co-host of Threeway Talk syndicated on CRN.
Sutton, Daron: KLAC, 2000-01. The son of Major League Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher Don Sutton, Daron is now part of the baseball broadcast team in Milwaukee.
Sutton, Ralph: KGFJ, 1984-86. Ralph is with the Urban League of Southern California.
Sutton, Robert P.: KNX, 1953-68. Born in Ogden, Bob started out as a vaudeville writer at the age of 7, performing with his parents. He later wrote for radio comedy shows. After the navy, he worked at WCCO-Minneapolis before joining KNX as pd in 1953. In 1961 Robert was named gm. Following his retirement in 1968 he turned to sculpting and also built a yacht in which he cruised the world. Robert died April 18, 1996, at the age of 87.
Svedja, Jim: KNX; KUSC, 1978-2012. Jim has a classical music show at KUSC and reviews films for KNX.

(Soul Assassins, Paul Sakrison, Mark Sheldon, G. Michael Sullivan, and Jen Sweeney) 

SWANEY, John: KFWB, 1968-78; KGIL, 1987-89. John anchored at KFWB from "day one" of the all-News format until he began the full-time practice of law ten years later. John graduated from Loyola Law School in 1977 and joined the law firm of Girardi, Keese and Crane in downtown L.A. For the next eight years, he was an active trial layer, specializing in plaintiff’s medical malpractice and products liability cases.

In 1986, John left the practice of law to return to broadcasting and becoming the host of "The Breakfast Edition" on KGIL and stayed until the station was sold in 1993. John was praised as a first-rate newsman and a friendly, enjoyable, decent person to know and work with. KFWB morning co-anchor Dan Avey had high praise for John: "John Swaney may have been the smartest, most insightful man I ever knew. It was a treat to work with him."

John died October 2, 1999, at the age of 57. A few months before his death, there was dreadful sight that flickered on our tv screens of an apartment building being dismantled in order to extract an 800-pound man. Turned out it was John Swaney. 

"Somebody has to care when somebody dies,” said K-EARTH morning man at the time, Charlie Van Dyke. “I did not know about the tragedy of his weight gain until reading it in LARadio.com. I hadn't seen him since 1964. My first meeting with John was in Dallas at KVIL, before it was the heritage station that it is today. It was a weekend and summer job for me. I was the dj. John was the newsman. We didn't agree about most things - radio, politics, the condition or future of the world. In fact, we actually had some friction when we worked the same shift. One day he said to me going into the 5 p.m. news on Sunday, ‘Hey, I need some extra time on the news.’ I, a high school junior eager to stay on format replied, ‘For what?’ He said, ‘Just give me the time, I'll take the heat.’”

Van Dyke continued: “He then personally chose to read a Kennedy funeral speech...now famous...‘So, she took the ring from her finger and placed it in his hand.’ [It had just cleared AP. John was moved and determined to share the emotion.] Let me tell you, he shared it. KVIL, in those days was a pathetic 1,000-watt daytimer that drug along a 119, 000 watt FM in simulcast. He read it; he made it ‘feel.’ John was always a mystery to me. I knew in an instant of meeting him that there was a great mind present in a complex personality. I wished, as a high school junior, that I could have been smart enough to debate him...because he loved that so much. I never made that happen.

Former KFWB newsman Andy Park remembered: "John Swaney had a voice that was in a class with Alexander Scourby, David McCullough, and Chet Huntley. In addition, he was a first-rate newsman and a friendly, enjoyable, decent person to know and with whom to work. His decision to become a lawyer late in life was typical of John's ability to accomplish what he wanted. His illness was a long-time distress to his many friends. His agony was in the breech of the personal privacy he so valued. He will be missed and he will be remembered by many of us who valued his friendship."

Sway: KKBT, 1996-2001. Sway hosts a Saturday night hip-hop show with King Tech at "the Beat."
Sweeney, Dave: KEZY, 1965-69; KGBS, 1969; KBBQ; KFOX, 1972-76; KALI, 1996-2006. Dave is vp of the West Coast for the owners of KALI.
Sweeney, Jen: KLYY, 1999; KACD, 2000. Jen worked weekends at KACD until the station was sold and changed format to Spanish in late summer of 2000.
Swenson, Steve: KFWB, 1980-85. Steve is general manager at WCBS-New York.

 

(Vin Scully, Dr. Tommy Smith, Bill Seward, Harry Shearer, and Bryan Suits)

Symonds, Dave: KEZY, 1982-84. David reports from London for various U.S. tv outlets, including the old McNeil/Lehrer Report.


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